Etymology
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bodily (adj.)
c. 1300, "pertaining to the body;" also opposed to "spiritual;" from body + -ly (1). As an adverb (with -ly (2)) from late 14c.
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biorhythm (n.)
also bio-rhythm, "cyclic variation in some bodily function," 1960, from bio- + rhythm. Related: Biorhythmic.
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hygrology (n.)

"science of bodily humors," 1787, from French or German hygrologie, which are earlier, or from hygro- "wet, moist; moisture" + -logy.

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incontinently (adv.)
early 15c., "immediately, without delay, at once," from incontinent + -ly (2). From 1550s as "unchastely;" in reference to bodily discharges from 1847.
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organically (adv.)

1680s in reference to bodily organs, "in an organic manner;" 1862 in reference to living beings; 1841 as "as part of an organized whole;" from organic. From 1971 as "without the use of pesticides, etc."

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calculous (adj.)
c. 1600, "of or pertaining to a bodily concretion;" 1670s, "stony, stone-like;" from Latin calculosus and (in the medical sense) directly from calculus "a pebble," diminutive of calx (genitive calcis) "limestone" (see chalk (n.)).
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bodacious (adj.)
1837 (implied in bodaciously), Southern U.S. slang, perhaps from bodyaciously "bodily, totally," or a blend of bold and audacious, which suits the earliest attested sense of the word. Popularized anew by the 1982 Hollywood film "An Officer and a Gentleman."
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gymnastic (adj.)
1570s, "pertaining to athletic exercise," from Latin gymnasticus, from Greek gymnastikos "fond of or skilled in bodily exercise," from gymnazein "to exercise or train" (see gymnasium).
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cachectic (adj.)
"pertaining to or characteristic of a bad state of bodily health," 1630s, perhaps via French cachectique (16c.), from Latinized form of Greek kakhektikos "in a bad habit of body" (see cachexia). Cachectical is from 1620s.
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constitutional (adj.)
1680s, "pertaining to a person's (physical or mental) constitution," from constitution + -al (1). Meaning "beneficial to bodily constitution" is from 1750. Meaning "authorized or allowed by the political constitution" is from 1765. Constitutional monarchy is recorded from 1801, from French. Related: Constitutionally.
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