Etymology
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able-bodied (adj.)
"healthy and sufficiently strong," 1620s; see able + body.
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workhouse (n.)
Old English weorchus "workshop;" see work (n.) + house (n.). From 1650s in the sense of "place where the able-bodied poor or petty criminals are lodged and compelled to work."
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flatworm (n.)

name applied to animals of the planarian group, a tapeworm or other simple unsegmented, soft-bodied invertebrate, 1721; see flat (adj.) + worm (n.). So called for their shape.

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mollusk (n.)

"soft-bodied invertebrate animal, usually with an external shell," 1783, mollusque (modern spelling from 1839), from French mollusque, from Modern Latin Mollusca (see Mollusca), the phylum name. Related: Molluscuous; molluscan.

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A.B. 

affixed to a name, abbreviation of Modern Latin Artium Baccalaureus "Bachelor of Arts" (see bachelor), 1773, American English. British English preferred B.A., perhaps because A.B. was used in Britain to mean able-bodied on seamen's papers.

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omnibus (n.)

1829, "long-bodied, four-wheeled public vehicle with seats for passengers," from French (voiture) omnibus "(carriage) for all, common (conveyance)," from Latin omnibus "for all," dative plural of omnis "all" (see omni-). Introduced by Jacques Lafitte in Paris in 1819 or '20, used in London from 1829.

As an adjective, in reference to legislation, "designed to cover many different cases, embracing numerous distinct objects," recorded from 1835; in U.S., used especially of the Compromise of 1850. Noun meaning "man or boy who assists a waiter at a restaurant" is attested from 1888 (compare busboy).

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stout (adj.)

c. 1300, "proud, valiant, strong," from Old French estout "brave, fierce, proud," earlier estolt "strong," from a Germanic source from West Germanic *stult- "proud, stately, strutting" (source also of Middle Low German stolt "stately, proud," German stolz "proud, haughty, arrogant, stately"), from PIE root *stel- "to put, stand, put in order," with derivatives referring to a standing object or place.

Meaning "strong in body, powerfully built" is attested from late 14c., but has been displaced by the (often euphemistic) meaning "thick-bodied, fat and large, bulky in figure," which is first recorded 1804. Original sense preserved in figurative phrase stout-hearted (1550s). Related: Stoutly; stoutness.

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porpoise (n.)

type of blunt-headed, thick-bodied cetacean common in the North Atlantic, early 14c. (late 13c. as a surname), porpas,porpays, porpeis, "the common porpoise," also the edible flesh of it, from Old French porpais (12c.) "porpoise," literally "pig fish," from porc "pig, swine" (from Latin porcus "pig," from PIE root *porko- "young pig") + peis "fish," from Latin piscis "fish" (from PIE root *pisk- "a fish").

The Old French word probably is a loan-translation of a Germanic word meaning literally "sea-hog, mere-swine;" compare Old English mereswyn, Old Norse mar-svin, Old High German meri-swin (Modern German Meerschwein), Middle Dutch mereswijn "porpoise," the last of which also was borrowed directly into French and became Modern French marsouin. Classical Latin also had a similar name, porculus marinus (in Pliny), and the notion behind the name likely is a fancied resemblance of the snout to that of a pig.

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dachshund (n.)

breed of short-legged, long-bodied dogs, 1844, from German Dachshund (15c.), from Dachs "badger" (Old High German dahs, 11c., cognate with Middle Dutch das "badger"), from Proto-Germanic *thahsuz "badger," perhaps literally "builder, the animal that builds," in reference to its burrowing (from PIE root *teks- "to weave," also "to fabricate"), but according to Watkins "more likely" borrowed from the same PIE source as the Celtic totemic name *Tazgo- (source of Gaulish Tazgo-, Gaelic Tadhg), originally "badger."

Second element is German Hund "dog" (see hound (n.)). Probably so called because the dogs were used in badger hunts, their long, thin bodies bred to burrow into setts and draw the animal out. French taisson, Spanish texon, tejon, Italian tasso are Germanic loan words.

Within the last few years this little hound has been introduced into England, a few couple having been presented to the Queen, from Saxony. The dachshund is a long, low, and very strong hound, with full head and sweeping ears. The fore legs are somewhat bandy, and when digging their action is very mole-like. [John Henry Walsh, "The Dog in Health and Disease," London, 1859]
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