Etymology
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bluster (v.)
late 14c., "stray blindly or blunderingly, wander aimlessly, go astray;" c. 1400, of persons, "shout loudly and angrily," from a Low German source, such as Middle Low German blüstren "to blow violently," East Frisian blüstern "to bluster," probably from the same source as blow (v.1), or perhaps imitative. Of weather in English from mid-15c. Related: Blustered; blustering.
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bluster (n.)
1580s, "a storm of violent wind," from bluster (v.). Meaning "noisy, boisterous, inflated talk" is from 1704.
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blustery (adj.)
1739, "noisy, swaggering," of persons; 1774, "rough, stormy," of weather; from bluster (n.) + -y (2). Blustering is from 1510s as "stormy, tempestuous;" 1650s as "boastful, swaggering." Shakespeare used blusterous.
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bully (v.)
"overbear with bluster or menaces," 1710, from bully (n.). Related: Bullied; bullying.
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gasconade (n.)
"a boast, boastful talk, bluster," 1709, from French gasconade (see Gascon + -ade); from gasconner (16c.) "to boast, brag," literally "to talk like a Gascon." As a verb in English from 1727.
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declamatory (adj.)

"of or characteristic of a declamation," 1580s, from Latin declamatorius "pertaining to the practice of speaking," from declamatus, past participle of declamare "to practice public speaking, to bluster," from de-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see de-) + clamare "to cry, shout" (from PIE root *kele- (2) "to shout").

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hector (v.)
"to bluster, bully, domineer," 1650s, from slang hector (n.) "a blustering, turbulent, pervicacious, noisy fellow" [Johnson], 1650s, from Hector of the "Iliad," in reference to his encouragement of his fellow Trojans to keep up the fight. Earlier in English the name was used generically for "a valiant warrior" (late 14c.). Related: Hectored; hectoring.
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fluster (v.)
early 15c. (implied in flostrynge), "bluster, agitate," probably from a Scandinavian source (compare Icelandic flaustr "bustle," flaustra "to bustle"), from Proto-Germanic *flaustra-, probably from PIE *pleud-, extended form of root *pleu- "to flow." Originally "to excite," especially with drink; sense of "to flurry, confuse" is from 1724. Related: Flustered; flustering; flustery. As a noun, 1710, from the verb.
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bounce (v.)
early 13c., bounsen "to thump, hit," of uncertain origin, perhaps from Dutch bonzen "to beat, thump," or Low German bunsen, or imitative. The sense probably has been influenced by bound (v.). In 17c., "to talk big, bluster; bully, scold." Meaning "to bound like a ball" is from 1510s; transitive sense "cause to rebound" is from 1876. Of a check, "be returned for insufficient funds" is from 1927. Related: Bounced; bouncing.
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declamation (n.)

late 14c., declamacioun, "composition written to be declaimed," from Latin declamationem (nominative declamatio) "exercise in oratorical delivery; declamation;" in a bad sense, "loud, eager talking," noun of action from past-participle stem of declamare "to practice public speaking, to bluster," from de-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see de-) + clamare "to cry, shout" (from PIE root *kele- (2) "to shout"). Meaning "a public harangue or speech" is from 1520s; sense of "act of making rhetorical harangues in public" is from 1550s.

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