Etymology
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birth (v.)
mid-13c., "be born," from birth (n.). Meaning "give birth to, give rise to" is from 1906. Related: Birthed; birthing.
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birth (n.)

c. 1200, "fact of being born;" mid-13c., "act of giving birth, a bringing forth by the mother, childbirth," sometimes in Middle English also "conception;" also "that which is born, offspring, child;" from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse *byrðr (replacing cognate Old English gebyrd "birth, descent, race; offspring; nature; fate"), from Proto-Germanic *gaburthis (source also of Old Frisian berd, Old Saxon giburd, Dutch geboorte, Old High German giburt, German geburt, Gothic gabaurþs), from PIE *bhrto past participle of root *bher- (1) "to carry; to bear children" (compare bear (v.)).

Suffix -th is for "process" (as in bath, death). Meaning "condition into which a person is born, lineage, descent" is from c. 1200 (also in the Old English word). In reference to non-living things, "any coming into existence" is from 1610s. Birth control is from 1914; birth certificate is from 1842.

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defect (v.)
Origin and meaning of defect

1570s, "to hurt, damage;" 1580s, "fail become deficient" (senses now obsolete); 1590s, "to desert, revolt," from Latin defectus, past participle of deficere "to fail, desert," from de "down, away" (see de-) + combining form of facere "to do, make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). Related: Defected; defecting.

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defect (n.)
Origin and meaning of defect

early 15c., "want or lack of anything," especially lack of something essential to perfection or completeness, from Old French defect and directly from Latin defectus "failure, revolt, falling away," noun use of past participle of deficere "to fail, desert," from de "down, away" (see de-) + combining form of facere "to do, make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").

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birth-mark (n.)
also birthmark, "congenital mark or blemish," by 1805, from birth (n.) + mark (n.1). Birth marks in 17c. could be longing marks; supposedly they showed the image of something longed for by the mother while expecting. Related: Birthmarked.
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malnutrition (n.)

"defect of sustenance from imperfect assimilation of food," 1843, from mal- + nutrition.

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blemish (n.)
"a defect, flaw, imperfection," 1520s, from blemish (v.).
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failing (n.)
late 14c., "failure;" 1580s, "defect, fault," verbal noun from fail (v.).
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stillbirth (n.)
also still-birth, 1764, from still (adj.) + birth (n.).
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