Etymology
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certificate (n.)

early 15c., "action of certifying," from French certificat, from Medieval Latin certificatum "thing certified," noun use of neuter past participle of certificare "to make certain" (see certify). Of documents of certification, testifying to the truth of the facts stated, from mid-15c.; especially a signed document attesting to someone's authorization to practice or do stated things (1540s).

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birth (v.)
mid-13c., "be born," from birth (n.). Meaning "give birth to, give rise to" is from 1906. Related: Birthed; birthing.
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birth (n.)

c. 1200, "fact of being born;" mid-13c., "act of giving birth, a bringing forth by the mother, childbirth," sometimes in Middle English also "conception;" also "that which is born, offspring, child;" from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse *byrðr (replacing cognate Old English gebyrd "birth, descent, race; offspring; nature; fate"), from Proto-Germanic *gaburthis (source also of Old Frisian berd, Old Saxon giburd, Dutch geboorte, Old High German giburt, German geburt, Gothic gabaurþs), from PIE *bhrto past participle of root *bher- (1) "to carry; to bear children" (compare bear (v.)).

Suffix -th is for "process" (as in bath, death). Meaning "condition into which a person is born, lineage, descent" is from c. 1200 (also in the Old English word). In reference to non-living things, "any coming into existence" is from 1610s. Birth control is from 1914; birth certificate is from 1842.

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birth-mark (n.)
also birthmark, "congenital mark or blemish," by 1805, from birth (n.) + mark (n.1). Birth marks in 17c. could be longing marks; supposedly they showed the image of something longed for by the mother while expecting. Related: Birthmarked.
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certificated (adj.)

"licensed or authorized by certificate," 1610s, past-participle adjective from obsolete certificate (v.) "furnish (someone) with a certificate," from Medieval Latin certificatus, past participle of certificare "to make certain" (see certify).

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decertify (v.)

"to remove a certificate or certification from," 1918; see de- + certify. Related: Decertification (1919).

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certified (adj.)

"attested by certificate," 1610s, past-participle adjective from certify. Certified public accountant attested from 1896; certified mail from 1955.

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aegrotat (n.)
certificate that a student is ill, Latin, literally "he is sick," third person singular of aegrotare "to be sick," from aeger "sick."
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scrip (n.)

1610s, "small piece of paper with writing on it, a written slip," apparently a corruption of script (n.). In the commercial use, "a certificate of a right to receive something" (especially a stock share), 1762, in this sense probably shortened from (sub)scrip(tion) receipt (see subscription). Originally "receipt for a portion of a loan subscribed;" the meaning "certificate issued as currency" is recorded by 1790. In U.S. history, "fractional paper money" (by 1889).

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