Etymology
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binomial (n.)

1550s, "an algebraic expression consisting of two terms," from Late Latin binomius "having two personal names," a hybrid from bi- "two" (see bi-) + nomius, from nomen (from PIE root *no-men- "name"). In zoology and botany, "a name consisting of two terms, generic and specific."

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trinomial (adj.)

1670s, "having three names," from tri- + second element from binomial. In mathematics, "consisting of three terms" (1704).

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polynomial 

1670s (n.), in algebra, "an expression consisting of many terms;" 1704 (adj.), "containing many names or terms;" irregularly formed from poly- + stem of binomial. By 1885 as "a technical name consisting of more than two terms."

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*no-men- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "name."

It forms all or part of: acronym; allonym; ananym; anonymous; antonomasia; antonym; binomial; caconym; cognomen; denominate; eponym; eponymous; heteronym; homonym; homonymous; hyponymy; ignominious; ignominy; innominable; Jerome; matronymic; metonymy; metronymic; misnomer; moniker; name; nomenclature; nominal; nominate; noun; onomastic; onomatopoeia; paronomasia; paronym; patronym; patronymic; praenomen; pronoun; pseudonym; renown; synonym; synonymy; synonymous; toponym.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit nama; Avestan nama; Greek onoma, onyma; Latin nomen; Old Church Slavonic ime, genitive imene; Russian imya; Old Irish ainm; Old Welsh anu "name;" Old English nama, noma, Old High German namo, Old Norse nafn, Gothic namo "name."

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