Etymology
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ben (n.)
"mountain peak" in Celtic place names (especially of roughly pyramidal peaks standing alone), 1788, from Gaelic beinn "peak, summit, mountain," from Old Irish *benno- "peak, horn, conical point," from PIE *bend- "projecting point."
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Big Ben (n.)
clock-bell in the Parliament tower in London, by 1861, generally said to have been named for Sir Benjamin Hall (1802-1867), first Chief Commissioner of Works, under whose supervision the bell was cast. The name later was extended to the clock itself and its tower.
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Bobadil (n.)
"blustering braggart," from the name of a boastful character in Ben Jonson's "Every Man in his Humour" (1598).
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yowza 
colloquial form of yes, sir, 1934, popularized by U.S. bandleader and radio personality Ben "The Old Maestro" Bernie (1891-1943).
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playwright (n.)

"writer or adapter of plays for the stage," 1680s (Ben Jonson used it 1610s as a mock-name), from play (n.) + wright (n.).

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B'nai B'rith (n.)
Jewish fraternal organization founded in New York City in 1843, Hebrew, literally "Sons of the Covenant," from bene, construct state of banim, plural of ben "son," + brith "covenant."
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harmonica (n.)
1762, coined by Ben Franklin as the name for a glass harmonica, from Latin fem. of harmonicus (see harmonic); modern sense of "reeded mouth organ" is 1873, American English, earlier harmonicon (1825).
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Barabbas 
biblical masc. proper name, Greek Barabbas, from Aramaic (Semitic) barabba, "son of the father," or "son of the master." In Hebrew, it would be ben abh. In the Crucifixion story, the name of the prisoner freed instead of Jesus at the crowd's insistence.
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candle-waster (n.)

"one who wastes candles," specifically a contemptuous word for one who follows occupations considered unprofitable or harmful, 1590s, from candle + agent noun from waste (v.).

A whoreson book-worm, a candle-waster. [Ben Jonson, "Cynthia's Revels"]
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astir (adv.)
"up and about," 1799, Scottish English, from phrase on the stir, or from Scottish asteer; from a- (1) + stir (see stir (v.)). Old English had astyrian, which yielded Middle English ben astired "be stirred up, excited, aroused."
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