Etymology
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behave (v.)
early 15c., reflexive, "conduct or comport" (oneself, in a specified manner), from be- intensive prefix + have in sense of "to have or bear (oneself) in a particular way, comport" (compare German sich behaben, French se porter). Cognate Old English compound behabban meant "to contain," and alternatively the modern sense of behave might have evolved from behabban via a notion of "self-restraint." In early modern English it also could be transitive, "to govern, manage, conduct." Related: Behaved; behaving.
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well-behaved (adj.)
1590s, from well (adv.) + past participle of behave (v.).
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misbehave (v.)

"conduct oneself improperly or indecorously," late 15c.; see mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + behave. Related: Misbehaved; misbehaving.

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behavior (n.)
"manner of behaving (whether good or bad), conduct, manners," late 15c., essentially from behave, but with ending from Middle English havour "possession," a word altered (by influence of have) from aver, noun use of Old French verb aveir "to have."
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*kap- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to grasp."

It forms all or part of: accept; anticipate; anticipation; behave; behoof; behoove; cable; cacciatore; caitiff; capable; capacious; capacity; capias; capiche; capstan; caption; captious; captivate; captive; captor; capture; case (n.2) "receptacle;" catch; catchpoll; cater; chase (n.1) "a hunt;" chase (v.) "to run after, hunt;" chasse; chasseur; conceive; cop (v.) "to seize, catch;" copper (n.2) "policeman;" deceive; emancipate; except; forceps; gaffe; haft; have; hawk (n.); heave; heavy; heft; incapacity; inception; incipient; intercept; intussusception; manciple; municipal; occupy; participation; perceive; precept; prince; purchase; receive; recipe; recover; recuperate; sashay; susceptible.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit kapati "two handfuls;" Greek kaptein "to swallow, gulp down," kope "oar, handle;" Latin capax "able to hold much, broad," capistrum "halter," capere "to grasp, lay hold; be large enough for; comprehend;" Lettish kampiu "seize;" Old Irish cacht "servant-girl," literally "captive;" Welsh caeth "captive, slave;" Gothic haban "have, hold;" Old English hæft "handle," habban "to have, hold."

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deportment (n.)

"manner of acting toward or before others," c. 1600, from French déportement, from déporter "to behave," from Old French deporter (see deport (v.1)).

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electronics (n.)
1910, from electronic; also see -ics. The science of how electrons behave in vacuums, gas, semi-conductors, etc.
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rough-house (n.)

1887, "uproar, disturbance," from rough (adj.) + house (n.). The verb, "behave or act boisterously or violently," is attested by 1896. Related: Rough-housing.

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deport (v.1)
Origin and meaning of deport

late 15c., "to behave," from Old French deporter "behave, deport (oneself)" (12c.), which also had a wide range of secondary meanings, such as "be patient; take one's (sexual) pleasure with; amuse, entertain; remain, delay, tarry; cheer, console, treat kindly; put aside, cast off, send away," from de "from, off" (see de-) + porter "to carry," from Latin portare "to carry," from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over." Related: Deported; deporting.

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comport (v.)

late 14c., "to bear, endure (grief, pain, etc.; sense now obsolete), from Old French comporter "endure, admit of, allow; behave" (13c.) and directly from Latin comportare "to bring together, collect," from com "with, together" (see com-) + portare "to carry" (from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over").

Meaning "to agree, accord, be suitable" (with with) is from 1580s. Meaning "to behave, conduct" (with a reflexive pronoun) is from 1610s. Related: Comported; comporting.

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