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cel (n.)
"celluloid sheet for an animated cartoon," from celluloid; became current by c. 1990 when they became collectible.
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quiche (n.)

"pastry case with a cooked, savory filling," a specialty of the Alsace-Lorraine region, 1949, from French quiche (1810), from Alsatian German Küche, diminutive of German Kuchen "cake" (see cake (n.)). The food became fashionable 1970s; became contemptible as indicative of wimpiness 1980s.

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motorway (n.)

"specialized highway for fast motor traffic," 1903, from motor- + way (n.). Earliest uses were hypothetical; the thing became a reality 1930s.

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Battenberg (n.)
type of cake, 1903, from name of a town in Germany, the seat of a family which became known in Britain as Mountbatten.
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drank (v.)

Old English dranc, singular past tense of drink. It also became past participle 17c.-19c., probably to avoid the pejorative associations of drunk.

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titanic (adj.)
"gigantic, colossal," 1709, from titan + -ic. The British passenger liner R.M.S. Titanic sank April 15, 1912, and the name became symbolic of the destruction of supposedly indestructible.
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art (v.)
second person singular present indicative of be; Old English eart. Also see are (v.). It became archaic in the 1800s.
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bandit (n.)
"lawless robber, brigand" (especially as part of an organized band), 1590s, from Italian bandito (plural banditi) "outlaw," past participle of bandire "proscribe, banish," from Vulgar Latin *bannire "to proclaim, proscribe," from Proto-Germanic *bannan "to speak publicly" (used in reference to various sorts of proclamations), "command; summon; outlaw, forbid" (see ban (v.)).

Vulgar Latin *bannire (or its Frankish cognate *bannjan) in Old French became banir, which, with lengthened stem, became English banish.
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photostat (n.)

1909, a type of copying machine (trademark Commercial Camera Company, Providence, R.I.) whose name became a generic noun and verb (1914) for "photocopy;" from photo- + -stat.

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