Etymology
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beating (n.)

c. 1200, beatunge "action of inflicting blows," verbal noun from beat (v.). The meaning "pulsation" is recorded from c. 1600. The nautical sense of "sailing against the wind" is by 1883.

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cardiogram (n.)

"a tracing of the beating of the heart made with a cardiograph," 1876, from cardio- + -gram.

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lashing (n.)

"a beating, flogging," c. 1400, verbal noun from lash (v.1).

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pelt (n.2)

"an act of pelting," 1510s, from pelt (v.). Of the beating of the rain by 1862.

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drubbing (n.)

"a sound beating," 1640s, verbal noun from drub (v.).

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wife-beater (n.)

1855, from wife (n.) + beater. Related: Wife-beating. As "sleeveless undershirt" by 1990.

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swingle (n.)

"instrument for beating flax," early 14c., from Middle Dutch swinghel "swingle for flax," cognate with Old English swingell "beating, stick to beat, whip, scourge, rod," from swingan "to beat, strike, whip" (see swing (v.)) + instrumental suffix -el (1). Or perhaps directly from the Old English word, with narrowing of sense.

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malleability (n.)

"capability of being shaped or stretched by pressure," especially by beating or rolling, 1680s, from malleable + -ity.

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licking (n.)

"an act of licking or lapping," late 14c., verbal noun from lick (v.1); meaning "a beating" (1756) is from lick (v.2).

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