Etymology
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basketball (n.)
also basket-ball, "game in which the object is to throw the ball into one of the two baskets placed at opposite ends of the court," 1892, American English, from basket + ball (n.1). The game was invented 1891 by James A. Naismith (1861-1939), physical education instructor in Springfield, Massachusetts, U.S.
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high-five (n.)
1980, originally U.S. basketball slang, 1981 as a verb, though the greeting itself seems to be older (Dick Shawn in "The Producers," 1968). From high (adj.) + five, in reference to the five fingers of the hand.
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tip-off (n.)
1901 in reference to information, from tip (v.2) + off (adv.). From 1924 in basketball, from tip (v.3).
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jumper (n.1)
"one who jumps," 1610s, agent noun from jump (v.). In basketball, "jump-shot," from 1934. The meaning "basket on an elastic cord permitting a small child to push off the floor" is short for baby-jumper (1848).
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basket (n.)

early 13c., from Anglo-French bascat; of obscure origin despite much speculation. On one theory, it is from Latin bascauda "kettle, table-vessel," said by the Roman poet Martial to be from Celtic British and perhaps cognate with Latin fascis "bundle, faggot," in which case it probably originally meant "wicker basket." But OED frowns on this, and there is no evidence of such a word in Celtic unless later words in Irish and Welsh, sometimes counted as borrowings from English, are original. As "a goal in the game of basketball," 1892; as "a score in basketball," by 1898.

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laker (n.)
a word used of people or things associated in various ways with a lake or lakes, including tourists to the English Lake country (1798); the poets (Wordsworth, etc.) who settled in that region (1814); boats on the North American Great Lakes (1887), and a person whose work is on lakes (1838); see lake (n.1). The U.S. professional basketball team began 1947 as the Minneapolis Lakers, where the name was appropriate; before the 1960-1 season it moved to Los Angeles, but kept the name.
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pick (n.2)

a name of pointed instruments of various kinds, and also other noun senses, in most cases from pick (v.) but in some perhaps with some influence of pick (n.1). Meaning "a blow with a pointed instrument" is from mid-15c; the sense in toothpick is from late 15c. The meaning "plectrum for a guitar, lute, etc." is from 1895. As a type of basketball block, from 1951. The meaning "right of selection, first choice" is by 1772, hence "choicest part or example" (by 1858). Meaning "instrument for picking locks" is by 1890.

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dribble (v.)

1580s, "let fall in drops or bits;" 1590s (intransitive) "fall in drops or small particles," frequentative of obsolete verb drib (1520s), a variant of drip (v.). The sports sense "give the ball a slight shove or bounce" first was used in soccer (1863), the basketball sense is by 1892 (implied in dribbling). Related: Dribbled. As a noun from 1670s.

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layup (n.)
also lay-up, 1927, "temporary period out of work," from the verbal phrase; see lay (v.) + up (adv.). Compare layoff. Basketball shot so called by 1955, short for lay-up shot (1947). The verbal phrase is attested from mid-14c. as "store away," 1550s as "confine to one's bed or room" (of illness); of ships in docks, 1660s. Related: Laid-up.
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Celtic (adj.)

also Keltic, 1650s, in archaeology and history, "pertaining to the (ancient) Celts," from French Celtique or Latin Celticus "pertaining to the Celts" (see Celt). In reference to the language group including Irish, Gaelic, Welsh, Breton, etc., from 1707. Of modern peoples or their other qualities, by mid-19c. The Boston basketball team was founded 1946. Celtic twilight is from Yeats's name for his collection of adapted Irish folk tales (1893).

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