Etymology
Advertisement
pride (n.)

Middle English prede, from late Old English pryto, Kentish prede, Mercian pride "unreasonable self-esteem, especially as one of the deadly sins; haughtiness, overbearing treatment of others; pomp, love of display," from prud (see proud (adj.)).

There is debate whether Scandinavian cognates (Old Norse pryði, Old Swedish prydhe, Danish pryd, etc.) are borrowed from Old French (which got it from Germanic) or from Old English.

In Middle English sometimes also positive, "proper pride, personal honor, good repute; exalted position; splendor," also "prowess or spirit in an animal." Used in reference to the erect penis from 15c. Meaning "that which makes a person or people most proud" is from c. 1300. First applied to groups of lions in a late 15c. book of terms, but not commonly so used until 20c. Paired with prejudice from 1610s.

Pride goþ befor contricioun, & befor falling þe spirit shall ben enhauncid. [Proverbs xvi.18, Wycliffe Bible, 1382]

Another late Old English/Middle English word for "pride, haughtiness, presumption" was orgol, orgel, which survived into 16c. as orgul, orgueil, from Old French orgoill (11c.), which is supposedly from a Germanic word meaning "renowned."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
pride (v.)

mid-12c. priden, in the reflexive sense "congratulate (oneself), be proud, indulge in self-esteem;" c. 1200 as "be arrogant, act haughtily," from pride (n.). Middle English also had a verb prouden, from the adjective, and Old English had prytan, prydan "be or become arrogant or haughty." Related: Prided; priding.

Related entries & more 
Barbados 

easternmost island of the West Indies, probably from Portuguese las barbadas "the bearded;" the island so called because vines or moss hung densely from its trees, or else for banyan trees. Related: Barbadian (1732).

Related entries & more 
prideful (adj.)

"full of pride, arrogant, insolent, scornful," c. 1500, from pride (n.) + -ful. Related: Pridefully; pridefulness. Old English had prutswongor "overburdened with pride." Middle English had prideless "without pride" in a good or bad sense (late 14c.), also proudful "ostentatious, indicative of pride" (mid-14c.).

Related entries & more 
proudness (n.)

"pride, arrogance; the sin of Pride," early 15c., proudnesse; see proud (adj.) + -ness.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
glory (v.)

mid-14c., "to rejoice" (now always with in), from Old French gloriier "glorify; pride oneself on, boast about," and directly from Latin gloriari which in classical use meant "to boast, vaunt, brag, pride oneself," from gloria (see glory (n.)). Related: Gloried; glorying.

Related entries & more 
supercilium (n.)

the eyebrow, 1670s, from Latin supercilium "an eyebrow; a ridge, summit;" figuratively "haughtiness, arrogance, pride" (see supercilious).

Related entries & more 
humiliating (adj.)

"humbling, mortifying, depressing or bating pride," 1757, present-participle adjective from humiliate (v.). Related: Humiliatingly.

Related entries & more 
yelp (n.)

Old English gielp "boasting, pride, arrogance," from source of yelp (v.). Meaning "quick, sharp bark or cry" is attested from early 16c.

Related entries & more 
moodiness (n.)

Old English modignes "pride, passion, anger;" see moody + -ness. Meaning "condition of being subject to gloomy spells, peevishness, sullenness" is from 1858.

Related entries & more