Etymology
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ballistic (adj.)

1775, "pertaining to construction and use of thrown objects," ultimately from Greek ballein "to throw" (from PIE root *gwele- "to throw, reach"). Of rockets or missiles (ones that are guided while under propulsion, but fall freely), from 1949. Ballistic missile is attested from 1954; they attain extreme heights, hence figurative expression go ballistic (1981) "become irrationally angry."

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identification (n.)

1640s, "treating of a thing as the same as another; act of making or proving to be the same," from French identification, probably from identifier (see identify). Psychological sense of "becoming or feeling oneself one with another" is from 1857. Meaning "act or process of determining the identity of something" is from 1859. Meaning "object or document which marks identity" is from 1947 (short for identification tag, card, etc.).

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misidentification (n.)

"erroneous identification," 1858, from mis- (1) + identification.

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ABM (n.)

1963, initialism (acronym) for anti-ballistic missile.

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ICBM (n.)

also I.C.B.M., 1955, initialism (acronym) for Inter-Continental Ballistic Missile. IBM in the same sense is from 1954.

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I.D. 

also ID (but pronounced as separate letters), short for identification, attested from 1955.

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PIN 

acronym for personal identification number, 1981; from the first it has been used with a redundant number.

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dog-tag (n.)

"soldier's identity disk," 1918, U.S. slang, from dog (n.) + tag (n.1). So called perhaps from resemblance to the identification/license tag on dog collars.

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mug-shot (n.)

also mugshot, "photograph taken by police of a person after an arrest for identification purposes," 1950; see mug (n.2) "a person's face" + shot (n.) in the photographic sense.

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card (v.1)

1540s, "to play cards" (now obsolete), from card (n.1). From 1925 as "to write (something) on a card for filing." Meaning "require (someone) to show an identification card" is from 1970s. Related: Carded; carding.

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