Etymology
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skirt (n.)
early 14c., "lower part of a woman's dress," from Old Norse skyrta "shirt, a kind of kirtle;" see shirt. Sense development from "shirt" to "skirt" is possibly related to the long shirts of peasant garb (compare Low German cognate Schört, in some dialects "woman's gown"). Sense of "border, edge" (in outskirts, etc.) first recorded late 15c. Metonymic use for "women collectively" is from 1550s; slang sense of "young woman" is from 1906; skirt-chaser first attested 1942.
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ballet (n.)
"theatrical, costumed dance and pantomime performance telling a story and representing characters and passions by gestures and groupings," 1660s, from French ballette from Italian balletto, diminutive of ballo "a dance," from Late Latin ballare "to dance," from Greek ballizein "to dance, jump about" (see ball (n.2)).
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skirt (v.)
c. 1600, "to border, form the edge of," from skirt (n.). Meaning "to pass along the edge" is from 1620s. Related: Skirted; skirting.
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tutu (n.)
ballet skirt, 1910, from French tutu, alteration of cucu, infantile reduplication of cul "bottom, backside," from Latin culus "bottom, backside, fundament," from PIE *kuh-lo- "backside, rear" (source also of Old Irish cul "back," Welsh cil "corner, angle"), ultimate origin obscure [de Vaan].
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miniskirt (n.)

also mini-skirt, "skirt with a hem-line well above the knee," 1965, from mini- + skirt (n.); reputedly the invention of French fashion designer André Courrèges (1923-2016).

"The miniskirt enables young ladies to run faster, and because of it, they may have to." [John V. Lindsay, New York Times, Jan. 13, 1967]

Related: Miniskirted.

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jete (n.)
ballet step, 1830, from French (pas) jeté, from past participle of jeter "to throw" (see jet (v.1)).
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balletomane (n.)

by 1930, from ballet + -mane "one who has a mania for," which is ultimately from Greek and related to mania "madness."

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longeron (n.)
airplane part, 1912, from French longeron, from longer "to skirt, extend along," from allonger "to lengthen" (see lunge (n.)).
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A-line (adj.)
descriptive of a dress or skirt flared in shape of a capital letter "A," 1955, in reference to the creations of French fashion designer Christian Dior (1905-1957).
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danseuse (n.)

"female dancer," especially a ballet-dancer," 1828, from French, fem. of danseur, agent noun from danser (see dance (v.)). The earlier word in English was danceress (Middle English daunceresse, late 14c.).

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