Etymology
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baldness (n.)

"state or quality of being bald," late 14c., from bald (adj.) + -ness.

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madarosis (n.)

"loss of the eyelashes," 1690s, medical Latin, from Greek madarosis "baldness." Related: Madarotic.

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anaphalantiasis (n.)

"the falling out of the eyebrows," 1853, earlier in French and German, from Greek anaphalantiasis "baldness in front," from ana "up" (see ana-) + phalanthos "bald in front."

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acomia (n.)

"baldness, want or deficiency of hair," a medical term, by 1860, a coinage in Modern Latin from  abstract noun suffix -ia (see -ia) + Latinized form of Greek akomos "hairless, bald," from a- "not, without" (see a- (3)) + komē "hair" (see comet).

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toupee (n.)

1727, from French toupet "tuft of hair, forelock," diminutive formed from Old French top "tuft, forelock, topknot" (12c.), from Frankish *top or another Germanic source related to top (n.1) "highest point." Originally an artificial curl or lock on the top of the head; a style, not necessarily a compensation for baldness. In 18c., also sometimes used of a person who wears a toupee. Slang short form toup is recorded from 1959.

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pattern (n.)

a Modern English variant of patron, retaining its other old sense of "outline, plan, model, an original proposed for imitation," from Old French patron "patron, protector; model, pattern." The difference in form and sense between English patron and pattern wasn't firm before 1700s. The meaning "a design or figure corresponding in outline to an object that is to be fabricated and serving as a guide for its shape and dimensions" is by late 14c. Extended sense of "repeated decorative design" is from 1580s. From 1640s as "a part showing the figure or quality of the whole." Meaning "model or design in dressmaking" (especially one of paper) is recorded by 1792 (Jane Austen). Pattern-book is from 1774; pattern-maker is by 1851; pattern baldness is by 1916.

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alopecia (n.)

late 14c., allopicia, "falling of the hair," also a form of leprosy involving loss of facial hair, from Medieval Latin alopecia, from Greek alōpekia, a disease of the skin, also alōpekiasis, from alōpēx, alōpekos "fox." Also known as fox-sickness. Usually explained as transferred to the human condition from the animal's susceptibility to mange.

The term alopekia is derived from [alōpēx], a fox, and would seem to be intended to represent a kind of baldness with scattered hairs, which we meet with in animals suffering under the mange—for example, the canine genus, of which the fox is an example. [Medical Times and Gazette, Oct. 22, 1870]

Other theories are that it is so named "from the fox's being supposed to lose its hair sooner than any other quadruped" [Hoblyn's "Dictionary of Terms Used in Medicine"].

Burne the heade of a great Ratte and myngle it wyth the droppynge of a Beare or of a hogge & anointe the head, it heleth the desease called Allopicia. [Humphrey Llwyd, "The Treasury of Healthe," 1585]
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