Etymology
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Australian (n.)
1690s, originally in reference to aboriginal inhabitants, from Australia + -an. As an adjective by 1814. Australianism in speech is attested from 1891.
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crawl (v.)

c. 1200, creulen, "to move slowly by drawing the body across the ground," from a Scandinavian source, perhaps Old Norse krafla "to claw (one's way)," or Danish kravle, from the same root as crab (n.1). If there was an Old English *craflian, it has not been recorded.

Meaning "advance slowly" is from mid-15c. Sense of "have a sensation as of something crawling on the flesh" is from c. 1300. Related: Crawled; crawler; crawling.

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crawl (n.)

1818, "act of crawling," from crawl (v.). In the swimming sense from 1903; the stroke was developed by Frederick Cavill, well-known English swimmer who emigrated to Australia and modified the standard stroke of the day after observing South Seas islanders. So called because the swimmer's motion in the water resembles crawling. Meaning "slow progress from one drinking place to another" is by 1883.

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kookaburra (n.)
1883, from a native Australian word.
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didgeridoo (n.)

"hollow, tubular musical instrument of Australian aborigines," 1924, Australian, of imitative origin.

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dingo (n.)

the Australian dog, of wolf-like appearance and very fierce, 1789, Native Australian name, from Dharruk (language formerly spoken in the area of Sydney) /din-go/ "tame dog," though the English used it to describe wild Australian dogs. Bushmen continue to call the animal by the Dharruk term /warrigal/ "wild dog." Plural dingoes.

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chunder (v.)
"vomit," 1950, Australian slang, of unknown origin.
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budgerigar (n.)
small Australian parrot, 1847, from a native Australian language, said to mean "good cockatoo," from budgeri "good" + gar "cockatoo."
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wallaby (n.)
kind of small kangaroo, 1826, from native Australian wolaba.
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preggo (adj.)

"pregnant," Australian slang, 1951, from pregnant (adj.1). Compare preggers.

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