Etymology
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attract (v.)
early 15c., "draw (objects or persons) to oneself," also a medical term for the body's tendency to absorb fluids, nourishment, etc., or for a poultice treatment to "draw out" diseased matter; from Latin attractus, past participle of attrahere "to draw, pull; to attract," from assimilated form of ad "to" (see ad-) + trahere "to pull, draw" (see tract (n.1)).

Of physical forces (magnets, etc.), from 17c. Figurative sense of "be attractive, draw to oneself the eyes or attentions of others" is from 1690s. Related: Attracted; attracting.
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attrahent (n.)
"that which attracts," 1660s, noun use of adjective meaning "drawing to, attracting," from Latin attrahentem (nominative attrahens), present participle of attrahere (see attract).
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attractive (adj.)
late 14c., "absorptive," from Old French atractif "having the power to attract" (14c.), from attract-, past participle stem of Latin attrahere (see attract). Meaning "having the quality of drawing people's eye or interest" is from 1580s; sense of "pleasing, alluring" is from c. 1600. Related: Attractively; attractiveness.
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attraction (n.)

c. 1400, attraccioun, originally medical, "action or property of drawing (diseased matter) to the surface," from Old French atraccion (13c.) and directly from Latin attractionem (nominative attractio) "a drawing together," noun of action from past-participle stem of attrahere "to draw, pull" (see attract).

Extended by c. 1600 to magnetic forces; figurative sense "quality in a person which draws interest or imagination" is from c. 1600. Meaning "a thing which draws a crowd, interesting or amusing exhibition" is from 1829, a sense that developed in English and soon transferred to the French equivalent of the word.

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hullo 
call to attract attention, by 1828; see hello.
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noticeable (adj.)

1796, "worthy of notice, likely to attract attention," from notice (n.) + -able. Meaning "capable of being noticed or observed" is from 1809. Related: Noticeably.

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wingding (n.)

1927, originally hobo slang, "counterfeit seizures induced to attract sympathy;" meaning "energetic celebration" is by 1949. As a type of dingbat fonts made by Microsoft, from 1990.

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allure (v.)
"tempt by the offering of something desired," c. 1400, from Anglo-French alurer, Old French aleurer "to attract, captivate; train (a falcon to hunt)," from à "to" (see ad-) + loirre "falconer's lure," from a Frankish word (see lure), perhaps influenced by French allure "gait, way of walking." Related: Allured; alluring.
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oi (interj.)

1962, vulgar or working class pronunciation of hoy a call or shout to attract attention (compare ahoy).

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court (v.)
Origin and meaning of court

1570s, "endeavor to gain the favor of by amorous attention," also "solicit, seek to win or attract," from court (n.), based on the sorts of behavior associated with royal courts. Related: Courted; courting.

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