Etymology
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attitude (n.)

1660s, "posture or position of a figure in a statue or painting," via French attitude (17c.), from Italian attitudine "disposition, posture," also "aptness, promptitude," from Late Latin aptitudinem (nominative aptitudo; see aptitude, which is its doublet).

Originally 17c. a technical term in art; later generalized to "a posture of the body supposed to imply some mental state" (1725). Sense of "a settled behavior reflecting feeling or opinion" is by 1837. Meaning "habitual mode of regarding" is short for attitude of mind (1757). Connotations of "antagonistic and uncooperative" developed by 1962 in slang.

Attitude is generally studied for the sake of looking graceful ; hence it is sometimes affected, the practice of it being then called attitudinizing. An attitude is often taken intentionally for the purpose of imitation or exemplification ; generally attitude is more artistic than posture. [Century Dictionary]
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tude (n.)
teenager slang shortening of attitude, 1970s.
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attitudinal (adj.)
"pertaining to attitude," 1831; see attitude + -al (1), and compare -tude.
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attitudinize (v.)

1784, "strike (physical) attitudes, pose affectedly, gesticulate;" see attitude + -ize. Of mental attitudes from 1864. Related: Attitudinized; attitudinizing. In 18c. English once had also attitudinarian "one who affects attitudes" (1756).

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aptitude (n.)
early 15c., "tendency, likelihood," from Late Latin aptitudo (genitive aptitudinis) "fitness," noun of quality from Latin aptus "joined, fitted" (see apt). Meaning "natural capacity to learn" is 1540s; that of "state or quality of being fit (for a purpose or position)" is from 1640s. Related: Aptitudinal. A doublet of attitude.
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pose (n.)

"act of posing the body; attitude, position, whether taken naturally or assumed for effect," 1818, from pose (v.1), in a sense developed in the French cognate. Figuratively, "attitude of mind or conduct," from 1884. Earlier in English it meant "something deposited, a pledge" (mid-15c., from Old French pose, past participle of poser), hence "a secret hoard or treasure."

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poser (n.1)

"one who practices an affected attitude," 1881, agent noun from pose (v.1); revived in teenager slang by 1983.

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elitism (n.)

"advocacy of or preference for rule or social domination by an elite element in a system or society; attitude or behavior of persons who are or deem themselves among the elite," 1951; see elite + -ism.

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Savonarola 

figurative for a puritan attitude toward the arts at least since Shaw (1916), from the name of Girolamo Savonarola (1452-1498), Dominican monk famous for his fierce opposition to moral licence and Church corruption.

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poseur (n.)
"one who practices affected attitudes," 1866, from French poseur, from verb poser "affect an attitude or pose," from Old French poser "to put, place, set" (see pose (v.1)). The word is English poser in French garb, and thus could itself be considered an affectation.
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