Etymology
Advertisement
attendant (n.)
"one who waits upon another," early 15c., from the adjective or from French noun use of present participle of atendre (see attend).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
attendant (adj.)
late 14c., "solicitous, attentive," from Old French atendant, present participle of atendre "expect, wait for, pay attention" (see attend (v.)). Sense of "serving under, accompanying in a dependent position" is from c. 1400; that of "closely consequent" is from 1610s.
Related entries & more 
waiter (n.)
late 14c., "attendant, watchman," agent noun from wait (v.). Sense of "attendant at a meal, servant who waits at tables" is from late 15c., originally in reference to household servants; in reference to inns, eating houses, etc., it is attested from 1660s.
Related entries & more 
groomsman (n.)
attendant on a bridegroom at a wedding, 1690s, from possessive of groom (n.2) + man (n.).
Related entries & more 
swain (n.)
mid-12c., "young man attendant upon a knight," from Old Norse sveinn "boy, servant, attendant," from Proto-Germanic *swainaz "attendant, servant," properly "one's own (man)," from PIE *swoi-no-, from root *s(w)e- "oneself, alone, apart" (see idiom). Cognate with Old English swan "shepherd, swineherd," Old Saxon swen, Old High German swein. Meaning "country or farm laborer" is from 1570s; that of "lover, wooer" (in pastoral poetry) is from 1580s.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
orderly (n.)

"military attendant who carries orders," 1781, short for orderly corporal, etc. Extended 1809 to an attendant at a hospital (originally a military hospital) charged with keeping things clean and in order, from orderly (adj.) in the military sense of "of or pertaining to communication or execution of orders" (1723).

Related entries & more 
stewardess (n.)
1630s, "female steward," from steward (n.) + -ess. Meaning "female attendant on passenger aircraft" is from 1931; used of ships (where she waited on the female passengers) from 1837.
Related entries & more 
lictor (n.)

late 14c., from Latin lictor "official attendant upon a magistrate," literally "binder," from past participle stem of *ligere "to bind, collect," collateral form of ligare "to bind, tie" (from PIE root *leig- "to tie, bind").

Related entries & more 
handmaid (n.)
"female servant," c. 1300, from hand (n.) in the sense in close at hand + maid. Compare Old English handþegn "personal attendant" and the original sense of handsome.
Related entries & more 
global warming (n.)
by 1983 as the name for a condition of overall rising temperatures on Earth and attendant consequences as a result of human activity. Originally theoretical, popularized as a reality from 1989.
Related entries & more