Etymology
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attainder (n.)
mid-15c., in law, "extinction of rights of a person sentenced to death or outlawry," from noun use of Old French ataindre "to touch upon; strike, hit; seize; accuse, condemn" (see attain). For use of French infinitives as nouns, especially in legal language, see waiver.
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waiver (n.)
"act of waiving," 1620s (modern usage is often short for waiver clause); from Anglo-French legal usage of infinitive as a noun (see waive). Baseball waivers is recorded from 1907. Other survivals of noun use of infinitives in Anglo-French legalese include disclaimer, merger, rejoinder, misnomer, ouster, retainer, attainder.
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taint (v.)

1570s, "to corrupt, contaminate," also "to touch, tinge, imbue slightly" (1590s), from Middle English teynten "to convict, prove guilty" (late 14c.), which is partly from Old French ataint, past participle of ataindre "to touch upon, seize" (see attainder). It also is from Anglo-French teinter "to color, dye" (early 15c.), from Old French teint (12c.), past participle of teindre "to dye, color," from Latin tingere (see tincture). Related: Tainted; tainting.

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