Etymology
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atmospheric (adj.)
1777, "pertaining to or existing in the atmosphere," from atmosphere + -ic. In a sense of "creating a mood or mental environment" it is from 1908. Atmospherics "disturbances in wireless communication" is from 1905.
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static (adj.)
1630s, "pertaining to the science of weight and its mechanical effects," from Modern Latin statica, from Greek statikos "causing to stand, skilled in weighing," from stem of histanai "to make to stand, set; to place in the balance, weigh," from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm." Earlier statical (1560s). The sense of "having to do with bodies at rest or with forces that balance each other" is first recorded 1802. Applied to frictional electricity from 1839.
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static (n.)
"random radio noise," 1912, from static (adj.). Figurative sense of "aggravation, criticism" is attested from 1926.
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hydrostatic (adj.)
"pertaining to the principles of equilibrium of fluids," 1670s, from hydro- "water" + -static "stabilizing" (see -stat). Related: Hydrostatics (1650s); hydrostatical.
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statics (n.)
branch of mechanics which treats of stresses and strains, 1650s, from Modern Latin statica (see static); also see -ics. Related: Statical; statically.
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meteoric (adj.)

1804, "pertaining to or of the nature of meteors;" earlier "dependent on atmospheric conditions" (1789), from meteor + -ic. Figurative sense of "transiently brilliant" is by 1836.

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steam-engine (n.)
1751; earlier in the same sense was fire-engine (1722), atmospheric engine.
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pneumatics (n.)

"the branch of physics which treats of the mechanical properties of gases, especially of atmospheric air," 1650s, from pneumatic. Also see -ics.

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sitzkrieg (n.)
1940, "static warfare" (such as prevailed in Europe in the winter of 1939-40), R.A.F. coinage on analogy of blitzkrieg (q.v.), from German sitz "a sitting," from sitzen "to sit" (see sit (v.)).
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ambiance (n.)
1923, a reborrowing of the French form of ambience (q.v.), used in art writing as a term meaning "atmospheric effect of an arrangement."
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