Etymology
Advertisement
alias (n.)
"assumed name," c. 1600, from alias (adv.).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
airs (n.)
"affected manner, assumed haughtiness," 1702, from air (n.2).
Related entries & more 
assumable (adj.)
"capable of being assumed," 1780 (re-assumable is from 1724), from assume + -able. Related: Assumably; assumability.
Related entries & more 
Trotskyite (n.)
1919, from Leon Trotsky, assumed name of Russian revolutionary leader Lev Davidovich Bronstein (1879-1940) + -ite (1).
Related entries & more 
godchild (n.)
"child one sponsors at baptism," c. 1200, "in ref. to the spiritual relation assumed to exist between them" [Century Dictionary], from God + child. The Old English word was godbearn
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Stalin 
Russian, literally "steel," assumed name of Soviet Communist Party and Soviet Union leader Iosif Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili (1879-1953). Also see Molotov.
Related entries & more 
Duce (n.)

1923, title assumed by Benito Mussolini (1883-1945), fascist leader of Italy; Italian, literally "leader," from Latin ducem, from PIE root *deuk- "to lead."

Related entries & more 
fiducial (adj.)
1570s, "assumed as a fixed basis for comparison," from Latin fiducialis "reliable," from fiducia "trust" (from PIE root *bheidh- "to trust, confide, persuade"). From 1620s as "pertaining to trust;" 1832 as "fiduciary."
Related entries & more 
fixture (n.)
1590s, "act of fixing," perhaps from fix (v.) on model of mixture, or from an assumed Latin *fixitatem. Meaning "anything fixed or securely fastened" is from 1812, an alteration of fixure (c. 1600).
Related entries & more 
Delphi 

oracle town on the slopes of Mount Parnassus, in Phocis, from Greek delphis "dolphin" (see dolphin). Supposedly Apollo assumed this form to found his famous sanctuary at that place.

Related entries & more