Etymology
Advertisement
No results were found for assimilator. Showing results for assimilation.
assimilation (n.)

early 15c., "act of assimilating," in reference to the body's use of nutrition, from Old French assimilacion, from Latin assimilationem (nominative assimilatio) "likeness, similarity," noun of action from past-participle stem of assimilare "to make like" (see assimilate).

The meaning "process of becoming alike or identical, conversion into a similar substance" is from 1620s. The figurative use is from 1790. The psychological sense is from 1855.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
malassimilation (n.)

also mal-assimilation, "faulty digestion, imperfect nutrition," 1840, from mal- + assimilation.

Related entries & more 
assimilationist (n.)

"one who advocates racial or ethnic integration," 1900, originally in reference to Hawaii and possessions obtained by the U.S. in the war against Spain; later with reference to Jews in European nations; see assimilation + -ist. In Portuguese, assimilado (literally "assimilated," past participle of assimilar) was used as a noun of natives of the Portuguese colonies in Africa who were admitted to equal rights and citizenship.

Related entries & more 
assimilative (adj.)

"characterized by assimilation; capable of assimilating or of causing assimilation," 1520s; see assimilate + -ive. Alternative assimilatory is from 1775.

Related entries & more 
acculturation (n.)

"the adoption and assimilation of an alien culture" [OED], 1880, from assimilated form of ad- "to" + culture (n.) + noun ending -ation.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
malnutrition (n.)

"defect of sustenance from imperfect assimilation of food," 1843, from mal- + nutrition.

Related entries & more 
humanization (n.)

"a making human or humane; assimilation to humanity," 1753, also humanisation, noun of action from humanize.

Related entries & more 
quinque- 

before vowels quinqu-, word-forming element from classical Latin meaning "five, consisting of or having five," from Latin quinque "five" (by assimilation from PIE root *penkwe- "five").

Related entries & more 
metabolize (v.)

1887 (transitive) "to subject to metabolism, transform by assimilation or decomposition;" 1934 (intransitive) "to perform metabolism;" from Greek metabole "a change" (see metabolism) + -ize. Related: Metabolized; metabolizing.

Related entries & more 
absorption (n.)
Origin and meaning of absorption

1590s, "a swallowing up" (now obsolete), from Latin absorptionem (nominative absorptio) "a swallowing," noun of action from past-participle stem of absorbere "swallow up" (see absorb). From 1714 specifically of "disappearance by assimilation into something else."

Related entries & more