Etymology
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Asperger's Syndrome (n.)

1981, named for the sake of Austrian pediatrician Hans Asperger (1906-1980), who described it in 1944 (and called it autistic psychopathy; German autistischen psychopathen). A standard diagnosis since 1992; recognition of Asperger's work was delayed, perhaps, because his school and much of his early research were destroyed by Allied bombing in 1944.

The example of autism shows particularly well how even abnormal personalities can be capable of development and adjustment. Possibilities of social integration which one would never have dremt of may arise in the course of development. [Hans Asperger, "Autistic psychopathy in Childhood," 1944]
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syndrome (n.)
"a number of symptoms occurring together," 1540s, from medical Latin, from Greek syndrome "concurrence of symptoms, concourse of people," from syndromos "place where several roads meet," literally "a running together," from syn- "with" (see syn-) + dromos "a running, course" (see dromedary). Psychological sense is from 1955.
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Down's Syndrome 

genetic disorder causing developmental and intellectual delays, 1961, from J.L.H. Down (1828-1896), English physician; chosen as a less racist name for the condition than earlier mongolism.

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SIDS (n.)
1970, acronym for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.
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SARS (n.)
by 2003, acronym from severe acute respiratory syndrome.
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AIDS (n.)
1982, acronym formed from acquired immune deficiency syndrome. AIDS cocktail attested by 1997, the thing itself said to have been in use from 1995.
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premenstrual (adj.)

also pre-menstrual, "preceding menstruation," 1865, from pre- "before" + menstrual. Premenstrual syndrome (1971) earlier was premenstrual tension (1928).

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jet lag (n.)
also jetlag, 1966, from jet (n.1) in the "airplane" sense + lag (n.). Also known in early days as time zone syndrome.
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carpal (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the wrist," 1743, from Modern Latin carpalis, from carpus "wrist" (see carpus). Carpal tunnel syndrome attested by 1970, from carpal tunnel (1896), the tunnel-like passage that carries nerves through the wrist.

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acquired (adj.)
c. 1600, "gained by effort," past-participle adjective from acquire. Of diseases, "occurring after birth, thus not dependent on heredity," 1842 (opposed to congenital); acquired immune deficiency is attested by 1980; acquired immune deficiency syndrome by 1982. Acquired taste is attested from 1734.
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