Etymology
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lord (v.)
Origin and meaning of lord
c. 1300, "to exercise lordship, rule as a lord," from lord (n.). Intransitive meaning "to play the lord, domineer" is late 14c. Related: Lorded; lording. To lord it is from 1570s.
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lord (n.)
Origin and meaning of lord

mid-13c., laverd, loverd, from Old English hlaford "master of a household, ruler, feudal lord, superior; husband," also "God," translating Latin dominus, Greek kyrios in the New Testament, Hebrew yahweh in the Old (though Old English dryhten was more frequent). Old English hlaford is a contraction of earlier hlafweard, literally "one who guards the loaves," from hlaf "bread, loaf" (see loaf (n.)) + weard "keeper, guardian" (from PIE root *wer- (3) "perceive, watch out for").

Compare lady (literally "bread-kneader"), and Old English hlafæta "household servant," literally "loaf-eater." For the contraction, compare Harold. The modern monosyllabic form emerged 14c. Meaning "an owner of land, houses, etc.," is from c. 1300; the sense in landlord. As the "usual polite or respectful form of address to a nobleman under the rank of a duke, and to a bishop" [OED] from 1540s. As an interjection from late 14c. Lords "peers of England," especially as represented in parliaments, is from mid-15c.

Lord's Prayer is from 1540s. Year of our Lord is from late 14c. (translating Latin anno domini) in reference to the incarnation of God in Christ. Lord knows (who, what, why, etc.), expressing a state of ignorance, is from 1711. Lord of the Flies (1907) translates Beelzebub (q.v.); William Golding's book was published in 1954. To drink like a lord is from 1620s.

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ascension (n.)

c. 1300, "ascent of Christ from earth into Heaven in the presence of his disciples on the 40th day after the Resurrection," from Latin ascensionem (nominative ascensio) "a rising," noun of action from past-participle stem of ascendere "to mount, ascend, go up" (see ascend). Astronomical sense is recorded late 14c.; meaning "action of ascending" is from 1590s. Related: Ascensional.

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lordling (n.)
"puny or contemptible lord," late 13c., from lord (n.) + -ling.
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warlord (n.)
also war-lord, 1856, from war (n.) + lord (n.). Often a translation of German Kriegsherr or Chinese junfa.
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Astyanax 
son of Hector and Andromache ("Iliad"), Greek, literally "lord of the city," from asty "city" (see asteism) + anax "chief, lord, master." Also the epithet of certain gods.
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dominical (adj.)

1550s, "of or pertaining to Christ as Lord;" 1620s, "of or pertaining to Sunday (as the Lord's day)," from Medieval Latin dominicalis, "pertaining to Sunday; pertaining to the Lord," from Latin dominicus, from dominus "lord,"  from domus "house" (from PIE root *dem- "house, household").

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hospodar (n.)

former title of appointed Ottoman governors of Moldavia and Wallachia, 1680s, from Old Church Slavonic gospodi "lord, master," literally "lord of strangers," from gosti "guest, friend," from PIE *ghostis- "stranger" (from root *ghos-ti- "stranger, guest, host"); second element from PIE root *poti- "powerful; lord." Compare host (n.1).

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Dominic 

masc. proper name, Italian and Late Latin, from Latin dominicus "Lordly, devoted to God," literally "pertaining to a lord," from dominus "lord, master," from domus "house" (from PIE root *dem- "house, household").

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liege (n.)
late 14c., "vassal of a feudal lord," also "a feudal sovereign, a liege-lord," probably from liege (adj.)) or from a noun use of the adjective in Old French or Anglo-French. A fully reciprocal relationship, so the adjective could apply to either party. Old French distinguished them as lige seignur "liege-lord" and home lige "liege-man."
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