Etymology
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ascend (v.)

late 14c., "move upward," from Latin ascendere "to climb up, mount," of planets, constellations, "come over the horizon," figuratively "to rise, reach," from ad "to" (see ad-) + scandere "to climb" (see scan (v.)). Also in 15c. used with a sense "to mount (a female) for copulation." The meaning "slope upward" is from 1832. Related: Ascended; ascending. An Old English word for it was stigan.

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ascending (adj.)

"proceeding from a lower position to a higher," 1610s, present-participle adjective from ascend (v.).

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reascend (v.)

also re-ascend, "to climb or mount again," mid-15c.; see re- "back, again" + ascend. Related: Reascended; reascending.

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ascender (n.)

"one who ascends," 1620s, agent noun from ascend (v.). In typography, "an ascending letter," by 1867.

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ascent (n.)

c. 1610, "action of rising, upward movement," from ascend on model of descend/descent. The meaning "act of climbing" is from 1753.

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ascendance (n.)

1742, from ascend + -ance. According to OED, properly "the act of ascending," but used from the start in English as a synonym of ascendancy "state of being in the ascendant, governing or controlling influence."

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ascension (n.)

c. 1300, "ascent of Christ from earth into Heaven in the presence of his disciples on the 40th day after the Resurrection," from Latin ascensionem (nominative ascensio) "a rising," noun of action from past-participle stem of ascendere "to mount, ascend, go up" (see ascend). The astronomical sense is recorded late 14c.; the meaning "action of ascending" is from 1590s. Related: Ascensional.

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ascendant (adj.)

late 14c., ascendent, in astrology, "rising over the horizon," from Latin ascendentem (nominative ascendans), present participle of ascendere "to mount, ascend, go up" (see ascend). The sense "moving upward, rising" is recorded from 1590s.

As a noun in astrology, "point of the ecliptic or sign of the zodiac which is on the eastern horizon at the moment of birth." The planet that rules the ascendant is believed to have predominant influence on the horoscope. Hence in the ascendant "ruling, dominant" (not, as is often thought, "rising"), 1670s, and the adjective meaning "superior, dominant," 1806.

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uprise (v.)

c. 1300, "stand up; get out of bed; ascend to a higher level," from up (adv.) + rise (v.). Similar formation in West Frisian oprize, Middle Dutch oprisen, Dutch oprijzen.

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bank (v.2)

1580s, "to form a bank or slope or rise," from bank (n.2). The meaning "rise in banks" is by 1870. That of "ascend," as of an incline, is from 1892. In aeronautics, from 1911. Related: Banked; banking.

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