Etymology
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group (v.)

"form into a group or groups," 1718 (transitive), 1801 (intransitive), from group (n.). Related: Grouped; grouping.

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group (n.)

1690s, originally an art criticism term, "assemblage of figures or objects forming a harmonious whole in a painting or design," from French groupe "cluster, group" (17c.), from Italian gruppo "group, knot," which probably is, with Spanish grupo, from a Germanic source, from Proto-Germanic *kruppaz "round mass, lump," part of the general group of Germanic kr- words with the sense "rounded mass" (such as crop (n.).

Extended to "any assemblage, a number of individuals related in some way" by 1736. Meaning "pop music combo" is from 1958. As it was borrowed after the Great Vowel Shift in English, the pronunciation of the -ou- follows French rather than English models.

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armed (adj.)

"equipped for battle," early 13c., past-participle adjective from arm (v.).

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Islamic (adj.)

"pertaining to Islam," 1791, from Islam + -ic.

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age-group (n.)

"a number of people of roughly similar age," 1876, originally a term in the science of demographics, from age (n.) + group (n.).

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pan-Islamic (adj.)

also pan-Islamic, "of or pertaining to all Muslims or Islamic lands," 1881; see pan- + Islamic. Related: Panislamism "aspiration of a union of Islamic countries."

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masjid (n.)

Islamic place of worship; see mosque.

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haram (adj.)

in Islamic terminology, "forbidden;" see harem.

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salat (n.)

Islamic ritual prayer, from Arabic salah "prayer."

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Sharia (n.)

Islamic religious law, 1855, from Arabic shari'ah "the revealed law," from shar' "revelation."

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