Etymology
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armed (adj.)

"equipped for battle," early 13c., past-participle adjective from arm (v.).

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unarmed (adj.)

c. 1300, "with armor removed," from un- (1) "not" + armed, or else past-participle adjective from unarm "strip of armor" (c. 1300), from un- (2) "opposite of" + arm (v.). Meaning "not fitted to attack, weaponless" is from late 14c.

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arm (v.)

"furnish with weapons," c. 1200, from Old French armer "provide weapons to; take up arms," or directly from Latin armare "furnish with arms," from arma "weapons," literally "tools, implements" of war (see arm (n.2)). The intransitive sense of "provide oneself with weapons" in English is from c. 1400. Related: Armed; arming.

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lancer (n.)

1580s, "soldier armed with a lance," from French lancier "soldier, knight armed with a lance," from Old French lance (see lance (n.)).

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gunny (n.2)

1940s, Armed Forces slang, short for gunnery sergeant.

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hoplite (n.)

"heavy-armed foot soldier of ancient Greece," 1727, from Greek hoplites "heavy-armed," as a noun, "heavy-armed soldier, man-at-arms," from hopla "arms and armor, gear for war," plural of hoplon "tool, weapon, implement." One who carries a large shield, as opposed to a peltastes, so called for his small, light shield (pelte).

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octopod 

1826 (adj.), "eight-footed or eight-armed;" 1835 (n.) "an eight-footed or eight-armed animal," especially an octopus, from Latinized form of Greek oktōpod-, stem of oktōpous (see octopus).

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Wehrmacht (n.)

"the armed forces of Germany," 1935, from German Wehrmacht (name of the armed forces 1921-1945), from Wehr "defense" (from PIE root *wer- (4) "to cover") + Macht "might" (from PIE root *magh- "to be able, have power").

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militiaman (n.)

"one who belongs to an organized and armed militia, member of a militia force," 1780, from militia + man (n.).

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rifleman (n.)

"man armed with a rifle, one skilled in shooting with a rifle," 1775, from rifle (n.) + man (n.). Formerly also a military designation of a soldier armed with a rifle (when most of the infantry carried muskets).

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