Etymology
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ardent (adj.)

early 14c., ardaunt, specifically of alcoholic distillates, brandy, etc., "flammable," from Old French ardant "burning, hot; zealous" (13c.), from Latin ardentem (nominative ardens) "glowing, fiery, hot, ablaze," also used figuratively of passions, present participle of ardere "to burn" (from PIE root *as- "to burn, glow").

The figurative sense ("burning with passions, desire, etc.") is from late 14c.; the general etymological sense of "burning, parching" (c. 1400) remains rare. Ardent spirits (late 15c.) retains the oldest English meaning, but the term now, if used at all, probably is felt in a figurative, causative sense. Related: Ardently.

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calid (adj.)

"hot, burning; ardent," 1590s, from Latin calidus "warm," from PIE root *kele- (1) "warm."

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cheerful (adj.)

c. 1400, "full of cheer, having good spirits," from cheer (n.) + -ful. Meaning "elevating the spirits" is from mid-15c. Related: Cheerfully; cheerfulness.

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ardency (n.)

1540s, "warmth of feeling, desire," from ardent + -cy. A figurative sense, the literal meaning "intensity of heat" is attested from 1630s.

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vehement (adj.)

early 15c., from Old French vehement, veement "impetuous, ardent" (12c.), from Latin vehementem (nominative vehemens) "impetuous, eager, violent, furious, ardent, carried away," perhaps [Barnhart] from a lost present middle participle of vehere "to carry" (from PIE root *wegh- "to go, move, transport in a vehicle"). The other theory is that it represents vehe- "lacking, wanting" + mens "mind." Related: Vehemently.

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peart (adj.)

"lively, in good spirits," a variant of pert (q.v.).

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dispirit (v.)

"depress the spirits of, deprive of courage," 1640s; see dis- + spirit. Related: Dispirited; dispiritedly; dispiriting.

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-mane 

word-forming element of French origin, "one who has a mania for," ultimately from Greek -manes "ardent admirer," related to mania "madness" (see mania).

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perfervid (adj.)

"very hot, very ardent," 1830, as if from Latin *perfervidus, from per "completely" (see per) + fervidus "glowing, burning; vehement" (see fervid). Related: Perfervidly.

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aspirational (adj.)

"characterized by steadfast desire for a higher position," 1860, from aspiration (n.1) + -al (1). Earlier adjectives were aspirant "aspiring, ambitious" (1814); aspiring "animated by ardent desire" (1570s).

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