Etymology
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archeological (adj.)
alternative spelling of archaeological (see archaeology); also see æ (1).
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site (n.)
"place or position occupied by something," especially with reference to environment, late 14c., from Anglo-French site, Old French site "place, site; position," and directly from Latin situs "a place, position, situation, location, station; idleness, sloth, inactivity; forgetfulness; the effects of neglect," from past participle of sinere "let, leave alone, permit," from PIE *si-tu-, from root *tkei- "to settle, dwell, be home."
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site (v.)
"to give a location to, place," 1590s, from site (n.). Related: Sited; siting.
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off-site (adj.)

"occurring away from a site," 1956, from off (prep.) + site (n.).

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on-site (adj.)
also onsite, 1959, from on + site. Originally in reference to Cold War military inspections.
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in situ 
1740, Latin, literally "in its (original) place or position," from ablative of situs "site" (see site (n.)).
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website (n.)
also web site, 1994, from web in the internet sense + site.
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Armageddon (n.)

"cataclysmic final conflict," 1811, figurative use of the place-name in Revelation xvi.16, site of the great and final conflict, from Hebrew Har Megiddon "Mount of Megiddo," a city in central Palestine, site of important Israelite battles.

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Taft 
surname, from a variant of Old English toft "homestead, site of a house."
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Gomorrah 
Biblical site, from Hebrew 'omer "sheaf" (of corn, etc.), probably a reference to the fertility of the region. Related: Gomorrean.
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