Etymology
Advertisement
apportion (v.)

"divide and assign according to rule," 1570s, from French apportionner, from Old French aporcioner "apportion, share out," from a- "to" (see ad-) + portioner "to divide into portions," from portion "share, portion" (see portion (n.)). Related: Apportioned; apportioning.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
apportionment (n.)

"a dividing into portions or shares," 1620s, from apportion + -ment. Perhaps influenced by French apportionnement. In U.S. especially of distribution of seats in the House of Representatives.

Related entries & more 
reapportion (v.)

also re-apportion, "make a new apportionment," 1832, from re- + apportion or else a back-formation from reapportionment. Related: Reapportioned; reapportioning.

Related entries & more 
baksheesh (n.)

1620s (variously spelled), in India, Egypt, etc., "a gratuity, present in money," from Persian bakhshish, literally "gift," from verb bakhshidan "to give" (also "to forgive"), from PIE root *bhag- "to share out, apportion; to get a share."

Related entries & more 
-phage 

word-forming element meaning "eater," from stem of Greek phagein "to eat," from PIE root *bhag- "to share out, apportion; to get a share."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
reallocate (v.)

also re-allocate, "apportion or assign again," by 1868, from re- "back, again" + allocate. Related: Reallocated; reallocating.

Related entries & more 
redistribute (v.)

also re-distribute, "distribute again, apportion afresh," 1610s, from re- "back, again" + distribute. Political economy sense is by 1863. Related: Redistributed; redistributing.

Related entries & more 
redistrict (v.)

"divide or apportion (a state) again into districts; redraw the boundaries of districts," 1838, in U.S. political sense, from re- "again" + district. Related: Redistricted; redistricting.

Related entries & more 
aphagia (n.)

"inability to swallow," 1854, from a- (3) "not, without" + abstract noun from Greek phagein "to eat" (from PIE root *bhag- "to share out, apportion; to get a share").

Related entries & more 
allowable (adj.)

late 14c., "worthy of praise;" mid-15c., "permissible, not forbidden," from Old French alloable "permissible, allowable," from alloer "allot, apportion, bestow" (see allow).

Related entries & more