Etymology
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appear (v.)

late 13c., "come into view," from stem of Old French aparoir, aperer "appear, come to light, come forth" (12c., Modern French apparoir), from Latin apparere "to appear, come in sight, make an appearance," from ad "to" (see ad-) + parere "to come forth, be visible; submit, obey," which is of uncertain origin; de Vaan says from a PIE *prh-o- "providing."

Of persons, "present oneself," late 14c. The meaning "seem, have a certain appearance" is late 14c. Related: Appeared; appearing.

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reappear (v.)

also re-appear, "appear again or anew, be seen again, return to sight," 1610s, from re- "back, again," here "repetition of an action,"+ appear. Related: Reappeared; reappearing.

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peer (v.)
"to look closely," 1590s, variant of piren (late 14c.), with a long -i-, probably related to or from East Frisian piren "to look," of uncertain origin. Influenced in form and sense by Middle English peren (late 14c.), shortened form of aperen (see appear). Related: Peered; peering.
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transparent (adj.)

early 15c., from Medieval Latin transparentem (nominative transparens), present participle of transparere "show light through," from Latin trans "across, beyond; through" (see trans-) + parere "come in sight, appear; submit, obey" (see appear). Figurative sense of "easily seen through" is first attested 1590s. The attempt to back-form a verb transpare (c. 1600) died with the 17c. Related: Transparently.

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disappear (v.)

early 15c., disaperen, "cease to be visible, vanish from sight, be no longer seen," from dis- "do the opposite of" + appear. Earlier was disparish (early 15c.), from French disparaiss-, stem of desapparoistre (Modern French disparaître).

Transitive sense, "cause to disappear," is from 1897 in chemistry; by 1948 of inconvenient persons. Related: Disappeared; disappearing; disappears. Slang disappearing act "fact of absconding, action of getting away," is attested by 1884, probably originally a reference to magic shows.

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apparition (n.)

early 15c., "supernatural appearance or manifestation," from Anglo-French aparicion, Old French aparicion, aparoison (15c.), used in reference to the Epiphany (the revealing of the Christ child to the Wise Men), from Late Latin apparitionem (nominative apparitio) "an appearance," also "attendants," in classical Latin "service; servants," noun of action from past-participle stem of apparere "appear" (see appear).

The meaning "ghost" is recorded from c. 1600; the sense differentiation between appearance and apparition is that the latter tends to be unexpected or startling. Related: Apparitional.

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appearance (n.)

late 14c., "visible state or form, figure; mere show," from Anglo-French apparaunce, Old French aparance "appearance, display, pomp" (13c.), from Latin apparentia, abstract noun from aparentem, past participle of apparere "come in sight, make an appearance," especially "be evident, be seen in public, show oneself" (see appear).

The meaning "semblance" is recorded from early 15c.; that of "action of coming into view" is by mid-15c.; that of "a coming before the public or an audience" is from 1670s. The phrase keeping up appearances is attested from 1751 (save appearances in a similar sense is by 1711; see save (v.)).

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apparent (adj.)

late 14c., "indisputable, clearly understood;" c. 1400, "easily seen or perceived," from Old French aparant "evident, obvious, visible," from Latin apparentem (nominative apparens) "visible, manifest," present participle of apparere "appear, come in sight" (see appear).

First attested in phrases such as heir apparent (see heir). The meaning "superficial, spurious" is from c. 1400; that of "appearing to the senses or mind but not necessarily real" is from 1640s. Apparent magnitude in astronomy (how bright a heavenly body looks from earth, as opposed to absolute magnitude, which is how bright it really is) is attested from 1875. Middle English had noun forms apparence, apparency, but both are obsolete since 17c.

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-phane 

word-forming element meaning "having the appearance of," from Greek -phanes, from phainein "bring to light, cause to appear, show," phainesthai "to appear" (from PIE root *bha- (1) "to shine").

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disappearance (n.)

"act or fact of disappearing; a ceasing to appear or exist," 1712; see disappear + -ance.

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