Etymology
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anode (n.)

1834, coined from Greek anodos "way upward," from ano "upward," from ana "up" (see ana-) + hodos "a way," a word of uncertain origin (see Exodus). Proposed by the Rev. William Whewell, English polymath, and published by English chemist and physicist Michael Faraday. So called from the path the electrical current was thought to take. Compare cathode. Related: Anodic, anodal.

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anodize (v.)
1931, from anode + -ize. Related: Anodized; anodizing.
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electrode (n.)

"one of the two ends of an open electrical circuit," 1834, coined by English physicist and chemist Michael Faraday from electro- + Greek hodos "a way, path, track, road" (a word of uncertain origin; see Exodus) on the same pattern as anode, cathode.

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anion (n.)

"a negatively charged ion, which moves toward the anode (q.v.) during electrolysis," 1834, proposed by the Rev. William Whewell, English polymath, and published by English physicist Michael Faraday, from Greek anion "(thing) going up," neuter past participle of anienai "go up," from ana "up" (see ana-) + ienai "go" (from PIE root *ei- "to go"). Related: Anionic.

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