Etymology
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No results were found for annwn. Showing results for annex.
annex (n.)
1540s, "an adjunct, accessory," from French annexe "that which is joined" (13c.), from annexer "to join" (see annex (v.)). Meaning "supplementary building" is from 1861.
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annex (v.)
late 14c., "to connect with," from Old French annexer "to join, attach" (13c.), from Medieval Latin annexare, frequentative of Latin annecetere "to bind to," from ad "to" (see ad-) + nectere "to tie, bind" (from PIE root *ned- "to bind, tie"). Usually meaning "to join in a subordinate capacity," but that notion is not in the etymology. Of nations or territories, c. 1400. Related: Annexed; annexing.
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*ned- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to bind, tie."

It forms all or part of: annex; annexation; connect; connection; denouement; net (n.) "netting, network, mesh used for capturing;" nettle; nexus; node; nodule; noose.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit nahyati "binds, ties;" Latin nodus "knot;" Old Irish nascim "I bind, oblige;" Old English net "netting, network."
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an- (2)
a later form of Latin ad "to" before -n- (see ad-), as in annex, announce, annihilate.
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appropre (v.)
mid-14c., "appropriate, take possession of," from Old French apropriier "annex; make fit or suitable" (12c., Modern French appropre), from Late Latin appropriare "make one's own" (see appropriate (v.)).
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anschluss (n.)
1924 as a German word in English, from German Anschluß, "connection; addition; junction," literally "joining, union," from anschließen "to join, annex," from an "at, to, toward" (from Old High German ana- "on;" see on) + schließen "to shut, close, lock, bolt; contract" (a marriage); see slot (n.2). Specifically the Pan-Germanic proposal to unite Germany and Austria, accomplished in 1938.
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anneal (v.)

Middle English anelen, from Old English onælan "to set on fire, kindle; inspire, incite," from on- "on" (see an- (1)) + ælan "to burn, bake," from Proto-Germanic *ailan, "probably" [Watkins] from the same PIE root meaning "to burn" that is the source of ash (n.1). It is related to Old English æled "fire, firebrand," Old Norse eldr, Danish ild "fire."

The -n- was doubled after c. 1600 by analogy of Latinate words (annex, etc.; compare accursed, afford, allay). Meaning "to treat by heating and gradually cooling" (of glass, earthenware, metals, etc., to toughen them) was in late Old English. Related: Annealed; annealing.

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annexation (n.)

1610s, "that which is added;" 1620s, "union" (now obsolete); 1630s, "action of adding to the end or adding a smaller to a greater," from Medieval Latin annexiationem (nominative annexatio) "action of annexing," noun of action from past-participle stem of annexare "to bind to," from ad "to" (see ad-) + nectere "to tie, bind" (from PIE root *ned- "to bind, tie"). The Middle English noun form was annexion "union; joining; territory acquired" (mid-15c.).

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