Etymology
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ankle (n.)

14c. ancle, ankle, from Old English ancleow "ankle," ultimately from PIE root *ang-/*ank- "to bend" (see angle (n.)). The Middle English and modern form of the word seems to be from or influenced by Old Norse ökkla or Old Frisian ankel, which are immediately from the Proto-Germanic form of the root, *ankjōn-(source also of Middle High German anke "joint," German Enke "ankle").

The second element in the Old English, Old Norse and Old Frisian forms perhaps is a folk-etymology suggestion of claw (compare Dutch anklaauw), or it may be from influence of cneow "knee," or it may be the diminutive suffix -el. Middle English writers distinguished inner ankle projection (hel of the ancle) from the outer (utter or utward ancle), and the word sometimes was applied to the wrist (ankle of þe hand).

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bracelet (n.)
"ornamental ring or clasped chain for the wrist," mid-15c., from Old French bracelet (14c.), diminutive of bracel, from Latin bracchiale "armlet," from bracchium "an arm, a forearm," from Greek brakhion "an arm" (see brachio-).
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anklet (n.)
"ornamental ring for an ankle," 1810, from ankle, with diminutive suffix -let, after bracelet, etc.
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bangle (n.)
"ornamental ring worn upon the arm or ankle," 1787, from Hindi bangri "colored glass bracelet or anklet."
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talaria (n.)
"winged sandals of Hermes (Mercury)" and often other gods (Iris, Eros, the Fates and the Furies), 1590s, from Latin talaria, noun use of neuter plural of talaris "of the ankle," from talus "ankle" (see talus (n.1)).
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armilla (n.)
1706, "bracelet," from Latin armilla "bracelet, armlet, arm ring," from armus "shoulder, upper arm" (from PIE root *ar- "to fit together"). Related: Armillary.
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tarsal (adj.)
"of or pertaining to the ankle or instep," 1817, from tarsus (n.) + -al (1), or from medical Latin tarsalis.
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tarsus (n.)
the ankle bones collectively, 1670s, Modern Latin, from Greek tarsos "ankle, sole of the foot, rim of the eyelid," originally "flat surface, especially for drying," from PIE root *ters- "to dry." The connecting notion is the bones of the "flat" of the foot (Greek tarsos podos).
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talus (n.1)
"anklebone," 1690s, from Latin talus "ankle, anklebone, knucklebone" (plural tali), related to Latin taxillus "a small die, cube" (they originally were made from the knucklebones of animals).
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manilla (2)

also manilio, "metal (usually copper) ring or arm-bracelet sold or bartered by European traders among African peoples," 1550s, from Spanish manilla, from Latin monilia, plural of monile "collar, necklace," from PIE *mon- "neck, nape of the neck" (source also of mane). Influenced in Spanish by Spanish mano "hand."

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