Etymology
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loofah (n.)
1879 (as lough, 1865), from Egyptian Arabic lufah, the name of the plant (Luffa ægyptiaca) with fibrous pods from which flesh-brushes are made.
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octagonal (adj.)

"eight-sided and eight-angled," 1570s, from octagon + -al (1).

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angle (v.2)
"to move at an angle, to move diagonally or obliquely," 1741, from angle (n.). Related: Angled; angling.
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English (n.2)
"spin imparted to a ball" (as in billiards), 1860, from French anglé "angled" (see angle (n.)), which is similar to Anglais "English."
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polygon (n.)

in geometry, "a plane figure with numerous angles," 1570s, from Late Latin polygonum, from Greek polygōnon, noun use of neuter of adjective polygōnos "many-angled," from polys "many" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill") + -gōnos "angled," from gōnia "angle, corner" (from PIE root *genu- (1) "knee; angle"). Related: Polygonal.

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agonic (adj.)

"having no angle," 1846, from Greek agonos, from a- "not" (see a- (3)) + -gonos "angled," from gōnia "angle, corner" (from PIE root *genu- (1) "knee; angle"). In reference to the imaginary line on the earth's surface connecting points where the magnetic declination is zero.

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abatis (n.)
"barricade defense made of felled trees with the branches angled outward," 1766, from French abatis, literally "things thrown down," from Old French abateiz "a casting down; slaughter, carnage" (12c.), from abatre "to beat down, throw down" (see abate).
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pentangle (n.)

"five-pointed or five-angled figure, a pentagon or pentacle," late 14c., pent-angel, "a representation of a five-pointed star;" see penta- + angle (n.). In some early uses perhaps a corruption of pentacle. Related: Pentangular.

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rectangular (adj.)

"right-angled, having an angle or angles of 90 degrees," 1620s, from French rectangulaire (16c.) or formed in English from Latin stem of rectangle + -ar. Of the competitor adjectives fallen lifeless about this word rectangulous (1610s) is perhaps most to be mourned. Related: Rectangularity.

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orthogonal (adj.)

"pertaining to or depending upon the use of right angles," 1570s, from French orthogonal, from orthogone, from Late Latin orthogonius, from Greek orthogonios "right-angled," from ortho- "straight" (see ortho-) + gōnia "angle, corner" (from PIE root *genu- (1) "knee; angle"). Related: Orthogonally; orthogonality.

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