Etymology
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amphibious (adj.)

1640s, "combining two qualities; having two modes of life," especially "living both on land and in water," from Latinized form of Greek amphibios "having a double life; living on land and in water" (see amphibian (adj.)). Of motor vehicles, from 1915.

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operation (n.)

late 14c., "action, performance, work," also "the performance of some science or art," from Old French operacion "operation, working, proceedings," from Latin operationem (nominative operatio) "a working, operation," noun of action from past-participle stem of operari "to work, labor" (in Late Latin "to have effect, be active, cause"), from opera "work, effort," related to opus (genitive operis) "a work" (from PIE root *op- "to work, produce in abundance").

The surgical sense of "act or series of acts performed upon a patient's body," usually with instruments, is first attested 1590s. The military sense of "act of carrying out a preconcerted series of movements" is by 1749.

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amtrac (n.)

amphibious assault vehicle, 1944, contraction of amphibious tractor (n.).

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operational (adj.)

1922, "pertaining to operation," from operation + -al (1). Meaning "in a state of functionality" is from 1944.

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working (n.)

"action, operation," verbal noun from work (v.).

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shampoo (n.)

1838, "act or operation of shampooing;" 1866, "soap for shampooing;" from shampoo (v.).

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appendectomy (n.)

"surgical operation to remove the appendix," 1891, a hybrid from appendix in the anatomical sense + -ectomy "a cutting, surgical removal."

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inoperable (adj.)

"incapable of being treated by surgical operation," 1856, from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + operable.

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commercialization (n.)

"operation of making (something) a matter of profit above other considerations," 1885, from commercialize + noun ending -ation.

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buzz-saw (n.)

"circular saw," 1849, American English, from buzz (v.) + saw (n.). So called from the sound it makes when in operation.

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