Etymology
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No results were found for amoebous. Showing results for amorous.
amorous (adj.)

c. 1300, "in love; inclined to love; sexually attracted," from Old French amoros "loving, in love; lovely" (13c., Modern French amoureux), from Late Latin amorosum, from Latin amor "love, affection, strong friendly feeling; one's beloved," from amare "to love, be in love with; find pleasure in" (see Amy). Related: Amorously; amorousness.

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polyamorous (adj.)

"desiring or having consensual intimate relations with more than one partner," by 1972, from poly- + amorous. Related: Polyamory.

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leer (n.)

"a significant glance, amorous or malign or both," 1590s, from leer (v.).

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footsie (n.)

"amorous play with the feet" [OED], 1944, from foot (n.). Footie in the same sense is from 1935.

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smoochy (adj.)

"amorous, meant for kissing," 1947, from smooch (n.) + -y (2).

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oeillade (n.)

"an oogling stare, an amorous gaze," 1590s, from French oeillide (15c.), from oeil "eye" (from Latin oculus, from PIE root *okw- "to see") + -ade.

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ogle (v.)

"to view with amorous glances or with a design to attract notice," 1680s, a cant word, probably from Low German oeglen, frequentative of oegen "look at," from oege "eye," from Proto-Germanic *augon-, from PIE root *okw- "to see." Related to Dutch ogen "to look at," from oog "eye." Related: Ogled; ogling. The noun meaning "an amorous glance" is attested from 1711; earlier it meant "an eye" (1700).

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petting (n.)

1873, "fondling, indulgence," verbal noun from pet (v.). Meaning "amorous caressing, foreplay" is from 1920 (in F. Scott Fitzgerald).

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nutty (adj.)

early 15c., "nut-like," from nut (n.) + -y (2); from 1660s as "abounding in nuts." Sense of "having the flavor of nuts" is by 1828. Slang meaning "crazy" is by 1898 (see nuts); earlier colloquial sense was "amorous, in love (with)," 1821. [Byron, in a slangy passage in "Don Juan" (1823) uses it of a beggar's doxy; a footnote defines it as "conjointly, amorous and fascinating."] Related: Nuttiness.

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lovesick (adj.)

also love-sick, "languishing with amorous desire," 1520s, from love (n.) + sick (adj.). Related: Lovesickness.

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