Etymology
Advertisement
amass (v.)
late 15c., "to heap up for oneself," from Old French amasser "bring together, assemble, accumulate" (12c.), from à "to" (see ad-) + masser, from masse "lump, heap, pile" (from PIE root *mag- "to knead, fashion, fit"). Related: Amassed; amassing; amassable.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
*mag- 
also *mak-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to knead, fashion, fit." It forms all or part of: amass; among; macerate; magma; make; mason; mass (n.1) "lump, quantity, size;" match (n.2) "one of a pair, an equal;" mingle; mongrel.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek magis "kneaded mass, cake," mageus "one who kneads, baker;" Latin macerare "soften, make soft, soak, steep;" Lithuanian minkyti "to knead;" Old Church Slavonic mazo "to anoint, smear;" Breton meza "to knead;" Old English macian "to make, form, construct, do," German machen "to make;" Middle Irish maistir "to churn."
Related entries & more 
treasure (v.)
late 14c., "to amass treasure; to store up for the future," also figurative, "regard as precious, retain carefully in the mind," from treasure (n.). Related: Treasured; treasuring.
Related entries & more 
hoard (v.)

"to treasure up, collect, and store; amass and deposit for preservation or security or for future use," Old English hordian, from the root of hoard (n.). Cognate with Old High German gihurten, German gehorden, Gothic huzdjan. Related: Hoarded; hoarding.

Related entries & more 
accumulate (v.)
1520s, "to heap up" (transitive), from Latin accumulatus, past participle of accumulare "to heap up, amass," from ad "to," here perhaps emphatic (see ad-), + cumulare "heap up," from cumulus "heap" (from suffixed form of PIE root *keue- "to swell"). From 1759 in intransitive sense of "grow in size or number." Related: Accumulated; accumulating.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
realize (v.)

1610s, "bring into existence, make or cause to become real," also "exhibit the actual existence of," from French réaliser "make real" (16c.), from real "actual" (see real (adj.)). The sense of "understand clearly, comprehend the reality of" is recorded by 1775. Sense of "obtain, amass, bring or get into actual possession" (money, profit, etc.) is from 1753. Related: Realized; realizing.

Related entries & more 
accumulation (n.)
Origin and meaning of accumulation

late 15c., "that which is heaped up, an accumulated mass," from Latin accumulationem (nominative accumulatio) "a heaping up," noun of action from past-participle stem of accumulare "to heap up, amass," from ad "to," here perhaps emphatic (see ad-), + cumulare "heap up," from cumulus "heap" (from suffixed form of PIE root *keue- "to swell"). Meaning "act of heaping up" is from c. 1600.

Related entries & more