Etymology
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Joseph 
masc. proper name, biblical son of Jacob and Rachel, and in the New Testament the name of the husband of Mary, mother of Jesus; from Late Latin Joseph, Josephus, from Greek Ioseph, from Hebrew Yoseph (also Yehoseph; see Psalms lxxxi.6) "adds, increases," causative of yasaph "he added." Its use in names of clothing and plants often is in reference to his "coat of many colors" (Genesis xxxvii.3).
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Alfred 

masc. proper name, Old English Ælfræd, literally "elf-counsel," from ælf (see elf) + ræd "counsel" (see rede). Alfred the Great was king of the West Saxons 871-899. Related: Alfredian (1814).

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nobelium (n.)

transuranic element, 1957, named for Alfred Nobel (q.v.). With metallic element ending -ium.

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Jose 
masc. proper name, from Spanish José, Spanish form of Joseph.
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Krupp (n.)
1883, in reference to guns made at the armaments works in Essen, Germany, founded by German metallurgist Alfred Krupp (1812-1887).
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Josephine 
fem. proper name, from French Jósephine, fem. of Joseph. Another fem. form in English is Josepha.
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Pilates 
c. 1980, physical fitness regimen developed c. 1920 by German-born physical fitness teacher Joseph Pilates (1883-1967).
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chlorophyll (n.)

green-colored stuff in plants, 1819, from French chlorophyle (1818), coined by French chemists Pierre-Joseph Pelletier (1788-1842) and Joseph Bienaimé Caventou (1795-1877) from chloro-, from Latinized form of Greek khlōros "pale green, greenish-yellow" (from PIE root *ghel- (2) "to shine," with derivatives denoting "green" and "yellow") + phyllon "a leaf" (from suffixed form of PIE root *bhel- (3) "to thrive, bloom").

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Jacquard (adj.)
in reference to a type of loom, 1841, from Joseph Marie Jacquard (1752-1834) of Lyons, inventor of new weaving technology c. 1800.
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ley (n.)
"line of a prehistoric track; alignment of natural and artificial features," 1922 [Alfred Watkins], apparently a variant of lea. Popular topic in Britain in 1920s-30s and again 1960s-70s.
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