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aggregate (v.)

c. 1400, "bring together in a sum or mass," from Latin aggregatus, past participle of aggregare "attach, join, include; collect, bring together," literally "bring together in a flock," from assimilated form of ad "to" (see ad-) + gregare "to collect into a flock, gather," from grex (genitive gregis) "a flock" (from PIE root *ger- "to gather"). Intransitive meaning "Come together in a sum or mass" is from 1855. Related: Aggregated; aggregating.

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aggregate (n.)
"number of persons, things, etc., regarded as a unit," early 15c., from Latin noun use of adjective aggregatum, neuter of aggregatus "associated, united," literally "united in a flock" (see aggregate (adj.)).
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aggregate (adj.)

c. 1400, from Latin aggregatus "associated, united," past participle of aggregare "add to (a flock), lead to a flock, bring together (in a flock)," figuratively "attach, join, include; collect, bring together," from ad "to" (see ad-) + gregare "to collect into a flock, gather," from grex (genitive gregis) "a flock,"from PIE root *ger- "to gather."

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aggregator (n.)
1530s, "an adherent;" 1620s, "a collector, compiler," agent noun from aggregate (v.).
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disaggregate (v.)

"separate into component parts," 1803, from dis- "reverse, opposite of" + aggregate (v.) "bring together in a sum or mass." Related: Disaggregated; disaggregating; disaggregation.

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*ger- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to gather." 

It forms all or part of: aggregate; aggregation; agora; agoraphobia; allegory; category; congregate; cram; egregious; gregarious; panegyric; paregoric; segregate.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit gramah "heap, troop;" Greek ageirein "to assemble," agora "assembly;" Latin grex "flock, herd," gremium "bosom, lap;" Old Church Slavonic grusti "handful," gramota "heap;" Lithuanian gurgulys "chaos, confusion," gurguolė "crowd, mass;" Old English crammian "press something into something else."

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yardage (n.)
"aggregate number of yards," 1900 in sports, from yard (n.2) + -age.
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individuality (n.)
1610s, "the aggregate of one's idiosyncrasies," from individual + -ity, or from Medieval Latin individualitas. Meaning "condition of existing as an individual" is from 1650s.
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novenary (n.)

1570s, "an aggregate of nine," from Latin novenarius (adj.) "consisting of nine," from novem "nine" (see nine). As an adjective, "pertaining to the number nine or consisting of nine," c. 1600.

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environment (n.)

c. 1600, "state of being environed" (see environ (v.) + -ment); sense of "the aggregate of the conditions in which a person or thing lives" is by 1827 (used by Carlyle to render German Umgebung); specialized ecology sense first recorded 1956.

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