Etymology
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affix (n.)
"that which is joined or attached," 1610s, from affix (v.) or from French affixe, noun use of the adjective from the verb in French. Related: Affixal.
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affix (v.)

"fasten, join, attach," 1530s, from Medieval Latin affixare, frequentative of Latin affigere (past participle affixus) "fasten to, attach," from ad "to" (see ad-) + figere "to fasten" (from PIE root *dheigw- "to stick, fix").

According to OED first used by Scottish writers and thus perhaps the immediate source was French affixer, a temporarily re-Latinized spelling of Old French afichier (Modern French afficher), from a Medieval Latin variant of the Latin verb. The older form in English was affitch (Middle English afficchen, late 14c.), from Old French afichier. Related: Affixed; affixt; affixing.

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*dheigw- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to stick, fix." 

It forms all or part of: affix; crucifix; crucify; dig; dike; ditch; fibula; fiche; fichu; fix; fixate; fixation; fixity; fixture; infibulate; infibulation; microfiche; prefix; suffix; transfix.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit dehi- "wall;" Old Persian dida "wall, stronghold, fortress," Persian diz; Latin figere "to fix, fasten, drive, thrust in; pierce through, transfix;" Lithuanian dygstu, dygti "germinate;" Old Irish dingid "presses, thrusts down;" Old English dic "trench, ditch," Dutch dijk "dam." 

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caption (v.)
"write a caption for, affix a caption on or to," by 1901, from caption (n.). Related: Captioned; captioning.
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label (v.)
"to affix a label to," c. 1600, see label (n.); figurative sense of "to categorize" is from 1853. Related: Labeled; labeling; labelled; labelling.
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tab (v.)
"designate, label, name," 1924, earlier "affix a tab to" 1872 (implied in tabbed), perhaps an alteration of tag (v.2). Related: Tabbing. Also see tab (n.1).
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star (v.)
1590s, "to affix a star or asterisk to," from star (n.). From 1718 as "to set with stars." Meaning "perform the lead part" (of actors, singers, etc.) is from 1824. Sporting sense is from 1916. Related: Starred; starring.
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squash (n.1)
gourd fruit, 1640s, shortened borrowing from Narraganset (Algonquian) askutasquash, literally "the things that may be eaten raw," from askut "green, raw, uncooked" + asquash "eaten," in which the -ash is a plural affix (compare succotash).
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witness (v.)
c. 1300, "bear testimony," from witness (n.). Meaning "affix one's signature to (a document) to establish its identity" is from early 14c. Meaning "see or know by personal presence, observe" is from 1580s. Related: Witnessed; witnessing.
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postdate (v.)

also post-date, "to affix a later date to than the real one," 1620s, from post- + date (v.1) "to assign a date to, to mark a date on." Related: Postdated; postdating. Intransitive meaning "be of a later date than" is by 1909.

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