Etymology
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adopt (v.)

"take to one's self, make one's own by selection," c. 1500, a back-formation from adoption or else from Old French adopter (14c.) or directly from Latin adoptare "chose for oneself, take by choice, select, adopt," especially "to take into a family, adopt as a child," from ad "to" (see ad-) + optare "choose, wish, desire" (see option (n.)).

Originally in English of friends, fathers, citizens, etc., as well as children. The specific sense of "to legally take as one's own child" and that of "to embrace, espouse" a practice, method, etc. are from c. 1600. Related: Adopted; adopting.

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adopter (n.)

"one who adopts" in any sense, 1570s, agent noun from adopt (v.).

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adoptee (n.)

"one who is adopted," 1849; see adopt (v.) + -ee.

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adoptive (adj.)

early 15c., adpotif, "by adoption," from Old French adoptif and directly from Latin adoptivus "pertaining to adoption," from stem of adoptere "to choose, adopt" (see adopt).

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acculturate (v.)

"adopt and assimilate an alien culture," 1925 (implied in acculturated), a back-formation from acculturation (q.v.). Acculturize was used from 1895. Related: Acculturating.

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dramatize (v.)

1780s, "to adopt for the stage," see drama (Greek stem dramat-) + -ize. Meaning "to express or manifest dramatically" is from 1823. Related: Dramatized; dramatizing.

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adoption (n.)

mid-14c., adopcioun, "action of taking (a child) as one's own; condition of being adopted," from Old French adopcion or directly from Late Latin adoptionem (nominative adoptio) "a taking as one's child," shorter form of adoptatio, noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin adoptare "chose for oneself, take by choice, select, adopt," especially "to take into a family, adopt as a child," from ad "to" (see ad-) + optare "choose, wish, desire" (from PIE root *op- (2) "to choose;" see option (n.)).

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affiliate (v.)

1761, "bring into close association," from Latin affiliatus, past participle of affiliare "to adopt a son," from ad "to" (see ad-) + filius "son" (see filial). Outside legal use, always figurative. Related: Affiliated; affiliating.

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reorient (v.)

also re-orient, 1897, transitive, "give a new direction to;" 1937, intransitive, "adjust (to), come to terms with, adopt a new direction;" from re- "back, again" + orient (v.) or perhaps a back-formation from reorientation. Related: Reoriented; reorienting. Alternative reorientate is recorded from 1913. Tennyson uses reorient as an adjective, "arising again or anew."

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naturalize (v.)

1550s, "admit (an alien) to rights of a citizen" (implied in naturalized), from natural (adj.) in its etymological sense of "by birth" + -ize. In some instances from French naturaliser. Of words or expressions, "adopt as native or vernacular," 1590s. Of plants or animals, "introduce and acclimatize in places or situations where they are not indigenous," by 1708. Related: Naturalizing.

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