Etymology
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inference (n.)
1590s, "action of inferring;" 1610s, "that which is inferred;" from Medieval Latin inferentia, from Latin inferentem (nominative inferens), present participle of inferre "bring into; conclude, deduce" (see infer).
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inferential (adj.)
1650s, from Medieval Latin inferentia (see inference) + -al (1). Related: Inferentially.
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illative (adj.)
1610s, "stating or introducing an inference" (of words such as because, then, therefore); 1630s, "inferential, arising from inference," from Late Latin illativus, from Latin illatus "brought in," used as past participle of inferre "to bring in, introduce" (see infer). Grammatical sense "case expressing motion into" is from 1890. As a noun from 1590s, "illative word." Related: Illation "action of inferring" (1530s).
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explicitly (adv.)

"plainly, without disguise or reservation of meaning, not by inference; clearly, unmistakably," 1630s, from explicit + -ly (2). Opposed to implicitly.

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generalization (n.)
1761, "act of generalizing," from generalize + noun ending -ation. Meaning "an instance of generalizing, an induction, a general inference" is from 1794.
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sequitur 

introducing an inference or conclusion, Latin, "it follows," from sequi "to follow" (from PIE root *sekw- (1) "to follow").

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epilogue (n.)

early 15c., epiloge, from Old French epilogue (13c.), from Latin epilogus, from Greek epilogos "a conclusion, conclusion of a speech, inference," from epi "upon, in addition" (see epi-) + logos "a speaking" (see -logy). Earliest English sense was theatrical.

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non sequitur (n.)

1530s, in logic, "an inference or conclusion that does not follow from the premise," a Latin phrase, "it does not follow," from non "not" + third person singular present indicative of sequi "to follow" (from PIE root *sekw- (1) "to follow").

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implicit (adj.)

1590s, "implied, resting on inference," from French implicite and directly from Latin implicitus, later variant of implicatus "entangled, confused, involved," past participle of implicare "entangle, involve," from assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + plicare "to fold" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait"). From c. 1600 as "resulting from perfect confidence (in authority), unquestioning" (especially of faith).

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conjectural (adj.)

"depending on conjecture, implying a guess," 1550s, from Latin coniecturalis "belonging to conjecture," from coniectura "a conclusion, interpretation, guess, inference," literally "a casting together (of facts, etc.)," from past-participle stem of conicere "to throw together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + iacere "to throw" (from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel"). Related: Conjecturally (mid-15c.); conjecturative (early 15c.).

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