Etymology
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acquired (adj.)

c. 1600, "gained by effort," past-participle adjective from acquire. Of diseases, "occurring after birth, thus not dependent on heredity," 1842 (opposed to congenital); acquired immune deficiency is attested by 1980; acquired immune deficiency syndrome by 1982. Acquired taste is attested from 1734.

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AIDS (n.)

1982, acronym formed from acquired immune deficiency syndrome. AIDS cocktail attested by 1997, the thing itself said to have been in use from 1995.

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acquire (v.)

"to get or gain, obtain," mid-15c., acqueren, from Old French aquerre "acquire, gain, earn, procure" (12c., Modern French acquérir), from Vulgar Latin *acquaerere, corresponding to Latin acquirere/adquirere "to get in addition to, accumulate, gain," from ad "to," here perhaps emphatic (see ad-), + quaerere "to seek to obtain" (see query (v.)). Reborrowed in current form from Latin c. 1600. Related: Acquired; acquiring.

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MapQuest 

internet map service, known by that name from 1996; acquired by AOL in 2000. As a verb, by 1997.

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acquirement (n.)

"act of acquiring; that which is acquired," 1620s, from acquire + -ment. Perhaps modeled on French acquerement (16c.).

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unsecure (adj.)

1630s, from un- (1) "not" + secure (adj.). A useful differentiation from insecure since the latter word acquired a psychological sense.

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gotten 

a past participle form of get, showing vestiges of the Old English form of the verb. With adverbs, "obtained or acquired" (in some specified manner) from mid-14c.

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unlearned (adj.)

c. 1400, "ignorant," from un- (1) "not" + learned (adj.). From 1530s as "not acquired by learning," from past participle of learn (v.). Old English had unlæred.

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kung fu (n.)

also kung-fu, 1966, a generalized Western term for Chinese martial arts, from dialectal Chinese kung fu, a term said to refer to any skill acquired through learning or practice.

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boo-boo (n.)

"mistake," 1954, apparently a reduplication of boob "stupid person," which had acquired a secondary sense of "foolish mistake" (1934). In 1930s it was the nickname of Philadelphia gangster Max "Boo-Boo" Hoff.

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