Etymology
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acquire (v.)
"to get or gain, obtain," mid-15c., acqueren, from Old French aquerre "acquire, gain, earn, procure" (12c., Modern French acquérir), from Vulgar Latin *acquaerere, corresponding to Latin acquirere/adquirere "to get in addition to, accumulate, gain," from ad "to," here perhaps emphatic (see ad-), + quaerere "to seek to obtain" (see query (v.)). Reborrowed in current form from Latin c. 1600. Related: Acquired; acquiring.
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reacquire (v.)

also re-acquire, "to get or gain anew, to obtain again," 1690s, from re- "back, again" + acquire. Related: Reacquired; reacquiring.

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acquirement (n.)

"act of acquiring; that which is acquired," 1620s, from acquire + -ment. Perhaps modeled on French acquerement (16c.).

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acquired (adj.)
c. 1600, "gained by effort," past-participle adjective from acquire. Of diseases, "occurring after birth, thus not dependent on heredity," 1842 (opposed to congenital); acquired immune deficiency is attested by 1980; acquired immune deficiency syndrome by 1982. Acquired taste is attested from 1734.
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acquisitive (adj.)

1630s, "owned through acquisition" (now obsolete, this sense going with acquired), from Latin acquisit-, past participle stem of acquirere "accumulate, gain" (see acquire) + -ive. Meaning "given to acquisition, avaricious" is by 1824. Related: Acquisitively (1590s); acquisitiveness.

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rearm (v.)

also re-arm, "provide with a new supply of weapons; acquire a new supply of weapons," 1805 (implied in rearming), from re- "back, again" + arm (v.) "to take up arms; supply with arms." In 20c., especially "to acquire more advanced weapons." Related: Rearmed.

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obtain (v.)

early 15c., obteinen, "to get or acquire, inherit, gain, conquer," from Old French obtenir "acquire, obtain" (14c.) and directly from Latin obtinere "hold, hold fast, take hold of, get possession of, acquire," from ob "in front of" (though perhaps intensive in this case; see ob-) + tenere "to hold," from PIE root *ten- "to stretch." Intransitive sense of "be prevalent or customary, be established in practice" is from 1610s. Related: Obtained; obtaining.

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lucrative (adj.)

"yielding gain, highly profitable," early 15c., from Old French lucratif "profitable" and directly from Latin lucrativus "gainful, profitable," from lucratus, past participle of lucrari "to gain, win, acquire," from lucrum "gain, profit" (see lucre). Related: Lucratively; lucrativeness.

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master (v.)

c. 1200, maistren, "to get the better of, prevail against; reduce to subjugation," from master (n.) and also from Old French maistriier, Medieval Latin magistrare. Meaning "acquire complete knowledge of, overcome the difficulties of, learn so as to be able to apply or use" is from 1740s. Related: Mastered; mastering.

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Amaretto 
Italian almond-flavored liqueur, 1945 (the original brand, Amaretto di Saronno, dates to 1851), from the Italian word for almond (q.v.), which did not acquire the unetymological -l- of the English word. Sometimes confused with amoretto. Amoroso (literally "lover"), a type of sweetened sherry, is attested from c. 1870.
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