Etymology
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accommodation (n.)

c. 1600, "that which supplies a want or need," from French accommodation, from Latin accommodationem (nominative accommodatio) "an adjustment," noun of action from past-participle stem of accommodare "make fit; make fit for" (see accommodate).

Meaning "appliance, anything which affords aid" is from 1610s; that of "act of accommodating" is from 1640s. Meaning "arrangement of a dispute" is from 1640s. An accommodation train (1838) was one making all stops (as opposed to an expresss); it was used earlier of stages (1811).

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reflex (n.)

c. 1500, "reflection of light, image produced by reflection," from a verb reflex meaning "refract, deflect" (late 14c.; compare reflect), from Late Latin reflexus "a bending back," noun use of past participle of reflectere "to bend back, bend backwards, turn away," from re- "back" (see re-) + flectere "to bend" (see flexible). Also as an adjective (1640s), "thrown or turned backward," also of thoughts or the mind. Meaning "involuntary nerve stimulation" is recorded by 1877, short for reflex action (1833) "simple, involuntary action of the nervous system."

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lodging (n.)
early 14c., "encampment;" late 14c., "temporary accommodation; place of residence," verbal noun from lodge (v.). Related: Lodgings.
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accommodations (n.)
"lodgings and entertainment," 1722, plural of see accommodation, which is attested from c. 1600 as "room and provisions, lodging."
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lodgement (n.)
also lodgment, "act of lodging," 1590s, from French logement (14c.) "accommodation, lodgings," from Old French logier (see lodge (v.)).
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wharfinger (n.)
"operator or manager of a wharf," 1550s, from wharfage "provision or accommodation at wharves" (mid-15c.), from wharf + agent noun suffix -er (1) + unetymological -n- as in messenger.
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reflexology (n.)

1927, as a psychological theory, from German reflexologie (1912); see reflex + -ology. As a foot massage technique for releasing nervous tension, recorded by 1976.

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knee-jerk (n.)
patellar reflex, a neurological phenomenon discovered and named in 1876; see knee (n.) + jerk (n.1) in the medical sense. The figurative use appeared soon after the phrase was coined.
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reflexive (adj.)

1580s, "reflective, capable of bending or turning back," from Medieval Latin reflexivus, from Late Latin reflexus (see reflect). Meaning "of the nature of a reflex" is from 1839 (implied in reflexively). Grammatical sense, in reference to verbs especially, "turning the action back upon the subject," is by 1740. Related: Reflexiveness; reflexivity.

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convenient (adj.)

late 14c., "fit, suitable, proper; affording accommodation; opportune, favorable," from Latin convenientem (nominative conveniens), present participle of convenire "to come together, meet together, assemble; unite, join, combine; agree with, accord; be suitable or proper (to)," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + venire "to come" (from a suffixed form of PIE root *gwa- "to go, come").

Meaning "personally suitable to ease of action or performance" is from late 15c. Sense of "at hand, easily accessible" (1849) is marked in OED as "Ireland and U.S."

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