Etymology
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accessory (adj.)
1550s, "subordinate;" c. 1600, "aiding in crime;" 1610s, "aiding in producing some effect," from Late Latin accessorius, from accessor, agent noun from accedere "to approach" (see accede). Meaning "aiding in crime" is from c. 1600.
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accessory (n.)

also accessary, early 15c., "that which is subordinate to something else," also as a legal term, "one aiding in a felony without committing the offense" (as by advising, inciting, concealing), from Late Latin accessorius, from Latin accessor, agent noun of accedere "to approach" (see accede).

Strictly the noun (a person) should be accessary, the adj. (and noun, a thing) accessory; but the distinction is too fine to be maintained. [Century Dictionary]

Especially in the visual arts, "object introduced to balance composition or enhance artistic effect" (1540s). Attested from 1896 as "woman's smaller articles of dress;" hence accessorize. Related: Accessorial.

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cephalic (adj.)

"pertaining to the head," early 15c., from Latin cephalicus, from Greek kephalikos "pertaining to the head," from kephalē "head" (see cephalo-).

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vein (n.)
c. 1300, from Old French veine "vein, artery, pulse" (12c.), from Latin vena "a blood vessel," also "a water course, a vein of metal, a person's natural ability or interest," of unknown origin. The mining sense is attested in English from late 14c. (Greek phleps "vein" had the same secondary sense). Figurative sense of "strain or intermixture" (of some quality) is recorded from 1560s; that of "a humor or mood, natural tendency" is first recorded 1570s.
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-cephalic 

word-forming element meaning "having a head" (of a specified type), from Greek kephalē "head" (see cephalo-).

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venule (n.)
"small vein," 1850, from Latin venula, diminutive of vena "vein" (see vein).
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megacephalic (adj.)

"having an unusually large head," 1876; see mega- + -cephalic.

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intravenous (adj.)
"in or occurring within a vein," 1847, from intra- "within, inside" + Latin venous, from vena "vein" (see vein). Related: Intravenously.
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phlebitis (n.)

"inflammation of a vein," 1820, medical Latin, from phlebo- "vein" + -itis "inflammation."

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phlebo- 

word-forming element in medicine meaning "a vein or veins," from Greek phlebo-, combining form of phleps "vein," a word of uncertain origin.

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