Etymology
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robe (n.)

"long, loose outer garment reaching almost to the floor, worn by men or women over other dress," late 13c., from Old French robe "long, loose outer garment" (12c.), from a Germanic source (compare Old High German rouba "vestments"), from West Germanic *raubo "booty" (cognate with Old High German roub "robbery, breakage"), which also yielded rob (v.).

Presumably the notion is of fine garments taken from an enemy as spoil, and the Old French word had a secondary sense of "plunder, booty," while Germanic cognates had both senses; as in Old English reaf "plunder, booty, spoil; garment, armor, vestment."

The meaning "dressing gown" is from 1854; such extended senses often appear first in French, e.g. robe de chambre "dressing gown," robe de nuit "nightgown." From c. 1300 in reference to official vestments and thus indicative of position or membership in a religious order, guild, etc.; metonymic sense of The Robe for "the legal profession" is attested from 1640s.

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robe (v.)

"to clothe," especially magnificently and ceremonially, c. 1300 (implied in robed), from robe (n.). Related: Robing; robery.

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academic (adj.)
Origin and meaning of academic
1580s, "relating to an academy," also "collegiate, scholarly," from Latin academicus "of the (classical Athenian) Academy," from Academia, name of the place where Plato taught (see academy).

From 1610s in English in the sense "belonging to the classical Academy in Athens." Meaning "theoretical, not practical, not leading to a decision" (such as university debates or classroom legal exercises) is from 1886. In the arts, "rigidly conforming to academic style," 1889. Academic freedom "liberty of a teacher to state opinions openly without fear of retribution," is attested from 1901. Related: Academical; academically; academicalism (1874); Johnson has academial.

As a noun, "student in college or university life," 1580s (Latin academicus, Greek akademikoi meant "Academic philosopher"). Also academian (1590s), while academician (1746) mostly was confined to members of the old societies for the promotion of sciences and arts.
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bathrobe (n.)
also bath-robe, 1894, from bath (n.) + robe (n.).
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disrobe (v.)

"to undress (oneself);" also, transitive, "divest of a robe or garments, denude;" 1580s; see dis- + robe. Perhaps from or based on Old French desrober (Modern French dérober). Related: Disrobed; disrobing.

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enrobe (v.)
1590s, from en- (1) "in" + robe (n.). Related: Enrobed; enrobing.
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Platonism (n.)

"the doctrines, opinions, or philosophy of Plato or of the Academic school," 1560s, from Plato (Greek Platōn; see Platonic) + -ism.

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multidisciplinary (adj.)

also multi-disciplinary, "combining many academic fields or methods," 1949, from multi- "many" + discipline (n.) + -ary.

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bona-roba (n.)
"a showy wanton" [Johnson], 1590s, from Italian buonaroba "as we say good stuffe, that is a good wholesome plum-cheeked wench" [Florio], literally "fine gown," from buona "good" (from Latin bonus "good;" see bonus) + roba "robe, dress, stuff, gear," from a Germanic source (see robe (n.)).
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stole (n.)

Old English stole "long robe, scarf-like garment worn by clergymen," from Latin stola "robe, vestment" (also source of Old French estole, Modern French étole, Spanish estola, Italian stola), from Greek stole "a long robe;" originally "garment, equipment," from root of stellein "to place, array," with a secondary sense of "to put on" robes, etc., from PIE root *stel- "to put, stand, put in order," with derivatives referring to a standing object or place. Meaning "women's long garment of fur or feathers" is attested from 1889.

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