Etymology
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abundance (n.)
Origin and meaning of abundance
"copious quantity or supply," mid-14c., from Old French abondance and directly from Latin abundantia "fullness, plenty," abstract noun from abundant-, past participle stem of abundans "overflowing, full," present participle of abundare "to overflow" (see abound).
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overabundance (n.)

also over-abundance, late 14c., overaboundaunce, "excess, superabundance," from over- + abundance. Middle English had also a verb, overabounden (late 14c.) "be very abundant; be too numerous or plentiful."

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copious (adj.)

"abundant, plentiful," mid-14c., from Latin copiosus "plentiful," from copia "an abundance, ample supply, profusion, plenty; riches, prosperity; ability, power, might," also the name of the Roman goddess of abundance," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see com-) + ops (genitive opis) "power, wealth, resources," from PIE root *op- "to work, produce in abundance." Related: Copiously; copiousness.

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oodles (n.)

"abundance, a large quantity," 1866, American English (Tennessee), perhaps from the caboodle in kit and caboodle.

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enrich (v.)
late 14c., "to make wealthy," from Old French enrichir "enrich, enlarge," from en- "make, put in" (see en- (1)) + riche "rich" (see rich). Figurative sense "supply with abundance of something desirable" is from 1590s. Meaning "to fertilize" is from c. 1600. Scientific sense of "to increase the abundance of a particular isotope in some material" is first attested 1945. Related: Enriched; enriching.
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fluency (n.)
1620s, "abundance;" 1630s, "smooth and easy flow," from fluent + abstract noun suffix -cy. Replaced earlier fluence (c. 1600).
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plenty (n.)

mid-13c., "abundance; as much as one could desire; an ample supply," from Old French plentee, earlier plentet "abundance, profusion" (12c., Modern French dialectal plenté), from Latin plenitatem (nominative plenitas) "fullness," from plenus "full, filled, greatly crowded; stout, pregnant; abundant, abounding; complete," from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill."

From early 14c. as "a large amount, a great deal." The meaning "condition of general abundance" is from late 14c. The colloquial adverb meaning "very much" is first attested 1842. Middle English had parallel formation plenteth, from the older Old French form of the word.

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deluxe (adj.)

also de luxe, 1819, from French de luxe, literally "of luxury," from Latin luxus "excess, abundance" (see luxury).

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affluence (n.)

mid-14c., "a plentiful flowing, an abundant supply," from Old French affluence, from Latin affluentia "affluence, abundance," literally "a flowing to," abstract noun from affluentem (nominative affluens) "flowing toward; abounding, rich, copious" (see affluent). The notion in the figurative Latin sense is of "a plentiful flow" of the gifts of fortune, hence "wealth, abundance of earthly goods," a sense attested in English from c. 1600. Latin affluentia is glossed in Ælfric's vocabulary (late Old English) by oferflowendnys.

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verbiage (n.)

"abundance of words," 1721, from French verbiage "wordiness" (17c.), from verbier "to chatter," from Old French verbe "word," from Latin verbum "word" (see verb).

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